Pugilism: stance analysis of Daniel Mendoza

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Pugilism: stance analysis of Daniel Mendoza

Postby Patrick on Fri Jun 30, 2017 1:27 am

Image

He was old english boxer and I find his stance interesting, because it reminds me of the Yi Quan stance.
Anyway here is an analysis of this stance:

http://www.dhyana-fitness.at- The philosophy and practice of a healthy life
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Re: Pugilism: stance analysis of Daniel Mendoza

Postby KEND on Fri Jun 30, 2017 7:20 am

What is described is certainly similar to Hsing Yi. He does not mention the stepping but it would be interesting to see if he used inch step and angled stepping. He appears to use very little windup and is powerful for a small man which suggests he developed natural short power [fajing] The IMA as a rule operate from 90% of extended arm position to shoulder to elbow distance[using elbows] then it merges into grappling. Would also be interesting to see if he used 'sensing/sticking' while infighting
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Re: Pugilism: stance analysis of Daniel Mendoza

Postby Patrick on Fri Jun 30, 2017 9:40 am

@KEND

what I have read so far suggest that one feature of pre queensberry rules boxing is a more "outstretched" guard for the use of forearm blocks/parries. Throwing and low kicking was allowed too.

I found "the modern art of boxing" by Daniel Mendoza, where he describes his style.

http://www.nycsteampunk.com/bartitsu/ma ... ng1789.pdf
http://www.dhyana-fitness.at- The philosophy and practice of a healthy life
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Re: Pugilism: stance analysis of Daniel Mendoza

Postby everything on Fri Jun 30, 2017 10:26 am

Great find! Reading through it now.

A bit about chopping:
Around blow is easily perceived in its
approach, and of course readily stopped; a
straight one with some little difficulty; but
that which is called the Chopper is guarded
against with less ease that either, as it is a
blow out of the common line of boxing,
and comes more suddenly than any other.
The arm is to be drawn back immediately
after giving this blow, so as to recover your
guard. It generally cuts where it falls, and
if it hits buy moderately hard on the bridge of
the nose, or between the brows, produces
disagreeable sensations, and causes the eyes
to water, so as to prevent your adversary
from seeing how to guard against the two
or


The preamble on Strength, Courage, Art is also pretty interesting. An excerpt:

The requisites necessary to form a good boxer, are five, viz. Strength, Courage,
Art, Activity, and Wind: but as
the two latter can be acquired in great
degree by practice, and therefore more properly
come under the head Art—all these
qualities may be resolveable into the three
first and great requisites, Strength Courage,
and Art.
It is a contested point with many, which
is the most important requisite, Strength or
Art:
amateur practices til gets right pro til can't get wrong
/ better approx answer to right q than exact answer to wrong q which can be made precise /
“most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. Source of all true art & science
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Re: Pugilism: stance analysis of Daniel Mendoza

Postby KEND on Fri Jun 30, 2017 11:07 am

The chopper sounds interesting. My friend Vinnie Giordano['Vanishing Flame'] researched SE Asian bare knuckle fighting for over 30 years and I recall him mentioning a slicing punch with the knuckles that cuts open the cheek
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