Resistance training and Macro-nutrition

Discussion on the three big Chinese internals, Yiquan, Bajiquan, Piguazhang and other similar styles.

Re: Resistance training and Macro-nutrition

Postby willie on Tue Aug 01, 2017 7:18 am

windwalker wrote:

The problem with this line of reasoning is that it depends on something that has yet to show results in present day
in accordance with an activity that past masters demoed their art in.

Go talk with any master archers and look at how their bodies developed according to the their craft.

The tennis player is good at tennis, at the level they play at their bodies adapt to enhance the activity..

What would be the activity that a taiji person is supposed to be good at?

How does anyone really know if not tested in the activity outside of push hands?

I have my own answers just interested in reading others.


This is a reasonable post windwalker.
I'm kind of leaning in a different direction a bit.
I don't think it's.
What would be the activity that a taiji person is supposed to be good at?

I think it's quite the opposite. Taiji, in my opinion enhances everything that has to do with balance and motion.

Weight resistance training is a totally separate topic. As you can see from WebMD, We were programmed to have muscle growth.
So I feel that countering the losses that begin after 30, is a great thing.
Last edited by willie on Tue Aug 01, 2017 7:20 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Resistance training and Macro-nutrition

Postby windwalker on Tue Aug 01, 2017 7:43 am

willie wrote:
windwalker wrote:


This is a reasonable post windwalker.
I'm kind of leaning in a different direction a bit.
I don't think it's.
What would be the activity that a taiji person is supposed to be good at?

I think it's quite the opposite. Taiji, in my opinion enhances everything that has to do with balance and motion.

Weight resistance training is a totally separate topic. As you can see from WebMD, We were programmed to have muscle growth.
So I feel that countering the losses that begin after 30, is a great thing.


I agree, to a point.
The point being what the enhancement" balance and motion" were developed for,
understanding that it can be used for anything, or other things.

Understand about resistance training, BTDT that as young guy don't feel its very useful in my present work although
for older or people or people trying to be more healthy of course its all part of a balanced program.

What Appledog, may be talking about is the reintegration of an activity outside of ones main practice.

For some people it may cause problems if overdeveloped in certain areas.
All activity at high levels of skill will affect the development and adaptation of the body/mind, kind of the point of the activity.
The amount it affects it depends on skill level achieved and objective trained for.

With out understanding this as noted,
some activities may be counter productive if not done with an understanding of what one is trying to achieve.
Last edited by windwalker on Tue Aug 01, 2017 7:46 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Resistance training and Macro-nutrition

Postby willie on Wed Aug 02, 2017 10:57 am

windwalker wrote:
I agree, to a point.
The point being what the enhancement" balance and motion" were developed for,
understanding that it can be used for anything, or other things.

Understand about resistance training, BTDT that as young guy don't feel its very useful in my present work although
for older or people or people trying to be more healthy of course its all part of a balanced program.

What Appledog, may be talking about is the reintegration of an activity outside of ones main practice.

For some people it may cause problems if overdeveloped in certain areas.
All activity at high levels of skill will affect the development and adaptation of the body/mind, kind of the point of the activity.
The amount it affects it depends on skill level achieved and objective trained for


With out understanding this as noted,
some activities may be counter productive if not done with an understanding of what one is trying to achieve.


Interesting. O.K. let's begin by looking at the power of an ape. About 8 times stronger then normal humans, would
you want to fight one? No! They have so much strength that the human would be completely shredded regardless of
what style you had. There was a lady who owned just a small monkey. One day she tried to tell that monkey what to do
and the monkey ripped her whole face right off...
Imagine just the finger strength of that. Would you want to push or grapple with someone who had finger strength so powerful
as to instantly dig under a bicep and rip it right off?
While I agree with you on taiji not needing strength, it's also important to realize peoples shortcomings in actually using it.
Having a bit of strength is a good equalizer in my opinion. Plus the extra muscle makes very good padding and the chicks love it too. LOL!
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Re: Resistance training and Macro-nutrition

Postby windwalker on Wed Aug 02, 2017 11:12 am

While I agree with you on taiji not needing strength, it's also important to realize peoples shortcomings in actually using it.
Having a bit of strength is a good equalizer in my opinion. Plus the extra muscle makes very good padding and the chicks love it too. LOL!


maybe my poor writing...I don't think I've said tiaji does not require nor need strength.
The question should be framed as "what kind"

yep the chicks dig it ;) probably the most important reason outside of health.

what some may be alluding to including myself is that if one is not careful
and does not understand what they'er doing they can and will introduce imbalances into their systems "for the chicks ;) "
which otherwise would tend to develop according to what ever activity that one did in natural way, with out weights.


A good coach or knowing what one is doing is important.
Many including myself may have experimented with them by trial and error,,,or in the traditional way using wood locks, or weaponry

As some and you noted a good coach can and will target and integrate the weight training to the activity....disregarding the "chicks" :P

I do agree that weight training for older people is probably one of the best things they can do, provided its guided with someone who knows
what they'er doing and why.
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Re: Resistance training and Macro-nutrition

Postby Steve James on Wed Aug 02, 2017 11:19 am

I think tcc requires strength, but I think the point is that it doesn't rely on the practitioner being stronger than his opponent. That principle is not unique to martial arts. Some would argue that the development of a skill that allows the weaker to defeat the stronger is central to many systems. Of course, whatever skill a weak person can have a strong person can have also. There's the disadvantage to using or depending on "strength." There's always someone stronger. But, apart from that, having strength can encourage someone to depend on it. Think of Foreman versus Ali.

Afa strength training being detrimental to tcc practice, in general, if that's true then the art is for people who don't work in construction or are athletes. However, I know lots of people who do tcc as a way to recover from hard work or competition. It's totally up to them to say whether it helps or not.

Otoh, I certainly don't think it's necessary --afa tcc goes-- to do weight training. But, if a boxer or wrestler does "fake" tcc, there's no big loss to him, the world, or tcc. You only have one life to live. One day six could turn out to be nine. :)
"A man is rich when he has time and freewill. How he chooses to invest both will determine the return on his investment."
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Re: Resistance training and Macro-nutrition

Postby willie on Sat Aug 05, 2017 9:11 am

Steve James wrote: Of course, whatever skill a weak person can have a strong person can have also.


Hi Steve, Yes, this is correct.
My Sifu was very much against me weight training, But last night I believe that I changed his mind a bit.
He found out that the added strength and muscle development "did not" effect the quality of my taiji.
Taiji is a different kind of skill that is deep underneath outwardly things like muscular strength.

I believe that people are far to gullible and believe things just because they have heard it from someone else "hear say".
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Re: Resistance training and Macro-nutrition

Postby johnwang on Sat Aug 05, 2017 1:53 pm

willie wrote:My Sifu was very much against me weight training, But last night I believe that I changed his mind a bit.

In Taiji PH, when you hold on both of your opponent's wrists and he can't even move, his Taiji skill will be useless. I have done that by cross my opponent's both arms against his own body.

My teacher also very much against me to use grips hold to disable my opponent's offense. Until when he saw my opponent could not move under my strong grip. He changed his mind. Later on, when someone said that someone is good in CMA, my teacher always loved to say, "Just let John to get a grip on him and see if he can still move." He finally agree with me that to "disable opponent's offense" is good strategy.
I'm still allergy to "push".
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Re: Resistance training and Macro-nutrition

Postby willie on Sun Aug 06, 2017 7:51 am

johnwang wrote:
willie wrote:My Sifu was very much against me weight training, But last night I believe that I changed his mind a bit.

In Taiji PH, when you hold on both of your opponent's wrists and he can't even move, his Taiji skill will be useless. I have done that by cross my opponent's both arms against his own body.

My teacher also very much against me to use grips hold to disable my opponent's offense. Until when he saw my opponent could not move under my strong grip. He changed his mind. Later on, when someone said that someone is good in CMA, my teacher always loved to say, "Just let John to get a grip on him and see if he can still move." He finally agree with me that to "disable opponent's offense" is good strategy.


My son has hand strength like that. Strength is definitely a consideration in any self defense situation.
The key word to escaping a move as described by you is "connectivity". This term is often misunderstood.
It requires dantian rotation. "The engine". With the general concept that, no one can stop another person from moving their hips.
So this internal link or connectivity is one of the most important skills in taiji.

The reason why my Sifu was surprised was not because of the use of strength, It was because I didn't use it.
Everyone has strength, even if they don't lift weights. So the entire argument over weight training as a negative, "In my opinion" is
just another complete misconception.

Nice talking to you!
Have a great day.
Last edited by willie on Sun Aug 06, 2017 8:17 am, edited 2 times in total.
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