Anyone do Chinese swordmanship?

Discussion on the three big Chinese internals, Yiquan, Bajiquan, Piguazhang and other similar styles.

Re: Anyone do Chinese swordmanship?

Postby Wanderingdragon on Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:06 pm

Course when I was in the pit I never lost a leg or an arm or got stabbed like in the other fantasy sparring scenarios of grown men. 8-)
Last edited by Wanderingdragon on Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Anyone do Chinese swordmanship?

Postby klonk on Sat Sep 30, 2017 7:35 pm

When you return to Europe, learn to fence.

There is an intellectual and analytical bent that makes it better than anything I have seen out of the orient.
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Re: Anyone do Chinese swordmanship?

Postby klonk on Sat Sep 30, 2017 8:13 pm

Also, babes.

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Re: Anyone do Chinese swordmanship?

Postby MaartenSFS on Thu Oct 05, 2017 3:32 am

Haha, that's a more valid argument than many have for studying an art.. :P

What I'm learning is honestly the barbarian's way of swordsmanship. I asked about using the edge to intercept incoming blows and other techniques and my master said that he would worry about that when the war was over (though to be fair the back edge of a sabre is thicker and softer). This type of sword in China was often crude and used by peasants to fend off bandits or by bandits to... fend off peasants. It was not revered. If you broke one, which happened to any kind of sword you could pick up someone else's or make or buy another one if you lived long enough. They would often be hanging on racks, more like tools than anything else. The length of the sword, weight, how to grip it weren't standardised. The hard training to wield them is - to an extent. Whether they are made of steel, wood or PVC doesn't matter (although sharp steel is the most lethal). The art has an answer for how to use it and get you out alive.

I'm learning to use internal power to deliver devastating blows and thrusts. Most of the unarmed training that I did is coming into practical use, like an extension of my body, with subtle differences. Using the blade and handle as a lever definitely increases the power, for example. I think that we do a lot more one-handed stuff than Kenjutsu, though I haven't seen much of what they do. The fencing has been great. Lots of bruises from good fights.. ;D

I've been filming motorbike stuff for a sword fighting video and am almost finished. Next I will film some training methods and lastly fencing. It's going to be a good one.
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Re: Anyone do Chinese swordmanship?

Postby MaartenSFS on Thu Oct 05, 2017 3:38 am

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wl8w0JB9U9Y

This is pretty much the opposite of how we train. First we learn an attack. Then we try it in fencing. Then we learn how to counter it. Then we fence again. Then we train solo repetitions of the attack. Repeat.

Another day we learn a defensive move. Then we drill it. Then we use it in fencing. Then we learn how to get past it. Then we fence again. Repeat.
Last edited by MaartenSFS on Thu Oct 05, 2017 4:13 am, edited 1 time in total.
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