Why doesn't Taiji have "roundhouse kick"?

Discussion on the three big Chinese internals, Yiquan, Bajiquan, Piguazhang and other similar styles.

Re: Why doesn't Taiji have "roundhouse kick"?

Postby Wanderingdragon on Fri Nov 03, 2017 8:13 am

Monkey, EVERY man can fight, woman and child too for that matter. To master AN art puts you among the elite you can kick with extreme prejudice when necessary and with a smile. As for the rest they are barbarians, it is a matter of awareness, even by the best, that they are not caught sleeping by a barbarian thug.
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Re: Why doesn't Taiji have "roundhouse kick"?

Postby MistyMonkeyMethod on Fri Nov 03, 2017 9:40 am

Maybe in Sparta. Not in any place I have seen.

No worries, I get out you guys, I've seen and trained with many that hold similar views. It's your life, do as you please. I too will do what I need to do. As I said earlier, different strokes for different folks.
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Re: Why doesn't Taiji have "roundhouse kick"?

Postby Wanderingdragon on Fri Nov 03, 2017 10:03 am

Whether you are aware or not, you make the point, violence is no longer the norm in modern society, fighting is no longer a necessary study. There are hobbyists, health enthusiasts, those committed to learn the art and of course boxers. Warriors are born of war.
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Re: Why doesn't Taiji have "roundhouse kick"?

Postby johnwang on Fri Nov 03, 2017 10:23 am

Steve James wrote:Aw, shuaijiao doesn't have a roundhouse kick either.

SC didn't have it before this generation. SC has it starting from this generation.

Last edited by johnwang on Fri Nov 03, 2017 1:54 pm, edited 3 times in total.
I'm still allergy to "push".
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Re: Why doesn't Taiji have "roundhouse kick"?

Postby MistyMonkeyMethod on Fri Nov 03, 2017 10:34 am

Wanderingdragon wrote:Whether you are aware or not, you make the point, violence is no longer the norm in modern society, fighting is no longer a necessary study. There are hobbyists, health enthusiasts, those committed to learn the art and of course boxers. Warriors are born of war.


Yeah, I made that point deliberately, more than once I think. It is the way it is, and that's fine, but people should be aware that there are differences, for their own sake at least, but I also think people have much more potential than they exploit. A critical eye is a big asset, and there is a lot of nonsense out there.
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Re: Why doesn't Taiji have "roundhouse kick"?

Postby marvin8 on Fri Nov 03, 2017 11:02 am

Trick wrote:
MistyMonkeyMethod wrote:.
Furthermore, I've travelled extensively and met many highly praised, respected masters from numerous styles, in Japan, Korea, China and numerous other countries in Asia who despite their talk and massive following, couldn't fight their way out of a wet paper bag, not only that, the physical condition many of them were in, left much to be desired. One commonality between them, they are happy with their practice and don't step out of their paradigm, comfort zone. It's quite delusional.

For me, such approaches are useless and will likely end disaster. The world is unpredictable, so is the violence inherent in it, I need to be able to fight under any circumstance, with anyone.
.

Yeah, God forbid the blasphemous practitioners that don't practice for death fights. In today's violent world of martial arts we must all prepare our selfs to fight in the cage, those who don't must vanish 8-)

Forgive those practitioners that choose to practice applying their art in actual combat against a resistant opponent, rather than rely only on the limited rules of forms, push hands, drills and faith. Competition can be used to gauge one’s ability to use one’s art in a fight, instead of waiting to see if it works against an attacker in the violent world. Better to lose a fight in a competition, than in the real world. Lei Lei could have saved himself embarrassment & business by testing his art in competition earlier, rather than just believing in himself.

A tennis player gets better at applying tennis strategies by playing against an opponent, not by just doing technique and drills. Through fight experience, martial artists can continue to grow in applying their art.

For those that choose not to compete, they can learn by watching/analyzing how their art is successfully applied in competition. They can adopt the same training methods, as those that compete.
Last edited by marvin8 on Fri Nov 03, 2017 11:08 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Why doesn't Taiji have "roundhouse kick"?

Postby oragami_itto on Fri Nov 03, 2017 11:11 am

marvin8 wrote:
Trick wrote:
MistyMonkeyMethod wrote:.
Furthermore, I've travelled extensively and met many highly praised, respected masters from numerous styles, in Japan, Korea, China and numerous other countries in Asia who despite their talk and massive following, couldn't fight their way out of a wet paper bag, not only that, the physical condition many of them were in, left much to be desired. One commonality between them, they are happy with their practice and don't step out of their paradigm, comfort zone. It's quite delusional.

For me, such approaches are useless and will likely end disaster. The world is unpredictable, so is the violence inherent in it, I need to be able to fight under any circumstance, with anyone.
.

Yeah, God forbid the blasphemous practitioners that don't practice for death fights. In today's violent world of martial arts we must all prepare our selfs to fight in the cage, those who don't must vanish 8-)

Forgive those practitioners that choose to practice applying their art in actual combat against a resistant opponent, rather than rely only on the limited rules of forms, push hands, drills and faith. Competition can be used to gauge one’s ability to use one’s art in a fight, instead of waiting to see if it works against an attacker in the violent world. Better to lose a fight in a competition, than in the real world. Lei Lei could have saved himself embarrassment & business by testing his art in competition earlier, rather than just believing in himself.

A tennis player gets better at applying tennis strategies by playing against an opponent, not by just doing technique and drills. Through fight experience, martial artists can continue to grow in applying their art.

For those that choose not to compete, they can learn by watching/analyzing how their art is successfully applied in competition. They can adopt the same training methods, as those that compete.


ANd wear gloves to protect the hands so you can punch bone harder and make for a better show. Or shin gaurds for your kicks.

Which is all well and good till you have to "win", in which case those are factors you have to train with/for. There are rules that can be exploited. The art becomes the art of winning that game.

I prefer non-competitive sparring. Pressure, intensity, but no ego or money on the line, just learning and experiencing. Anything but a real fight is just a game, competitive formats make you forget that.
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Re: Why doesn't Taiji have "roundhouse kick"?

Postby Trick on Sat Nov 04, 2017 12:14 am

marvin8 wrote:Forgive those practitioners that choose to practice applying their art in actual combat against a resistant opponent.

Why, what did they do wrong?
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Re: Why doesn't Taiji have "roundhouse kick"?

Postby Trick on Sat Nov 04, 2017 12:46 am

I've never liked (practice wise) the "obvious" kicking postures/sequences of in any of the Taiji forms I practice, can not put my finger on why, I just don't like to do those kicks. Back when I did Karate I favored the roundhouse, side and spinning back kick, I use to score a lot with those kicks and I just loved to practice them on heavy bags and kicking pads. But when I began practicing CMA I began disliking kicking practice, maybe it is the TCMA way of kicking I don't like. Now I have no big interest anymore for high flying kicks, but take interest in the "subtle low kicks" found in most TJQ forms and the other IMA
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Re: Why doesn't Taiji have "roundhouse kick"?

Postby MistyMonkeyMethod on Sun Nov 05, 2017 1:56 am

Could be interesting to discuss what mechanism generates the power behind the kick in TJQ/KF.

I've come across two methods which differentiate a bit from the norm, in my opinion anyway..

The one for low level kicks, described in a crude way, is generating force by squeezing/closing the legs/thighs together, say in a front stance, without actually moving the legs closer together, kind of isometric I guess, then lifting rear leg which is driven forward by the former isometric contraction, as the foot/ground friction keeping the rear foot planted is released.

For roundhouse type kicks, I guess I would describe it as rolling the hips/pelvis, I guess it's kind of like a 3D figure of 8, then using this to swing the leg through like a bat. It's pretty similar to MT in some sense, but perhaps less obvious as the movement can be made quite tight and consequently less visible.

Much easier shown then written I think, but let's see if it makes some sense.
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