Northern vs Southern arts

Discussion on the three big Chinese internals, Yiquan, Bajiquan, Piguazhang and other similar styles.

Re: Northern vs Southern arts

Postby GrahamB on Thu Apr 05, 2018 12:59 am

As the chief purveyor of I-think-you'll-find-ism here, I believe you'll find that the original inspiration was this guy:

Image
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Re: Northern vs Southern arts

Postby Trick on Thu Apr 05, 2018 1:54 am

GrahamB wrote:As the chief purveyor of I-think-you'll-find-ism here, I believe you'll find that the original inspiration was this guy:

Image

Even that I'm a Swede I couldn't understand a word of what he said...maybe it was Chef language 8-)
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Re: Northern vs Southern arts

Postby GrahamB on Thu Apr 05, 2018 2:00 am

I believe he was saying this:

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Re: Northern vs Southern arts

Postby zrm on Thu Apr 05, 2018 5:24 am

Trick wrote:What about that "stomped" wear and tear floor and that wall painting with dark and fair skinned monks mixing it up in Kung fu'ish sparring....are these part of the original temple?.....If remember right I recall reading that Doshin-So(founder of Japanese Shorinji Kempo) witnessed those wall paintings(early30's maybe?)


Yes, that was only part of the original temple left standing. I think some the engraved stone tablets in the front courtyard are originals too. There are graves in the pagoda forest that are very old too.
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Re: Northern vs Southern arts

Postby zrm on Thu Apr 05, 2018 5:26 am

GrahamB wrote:The first article you'll find is this one:
https://www.yogajournal.com/yoga-101/yo ... ater-truth


That's pretty interesting and I was unaware of this influence. Thanks.
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Re: Northern vs Southern arts

Postby GrahamB on Thu Apr 05, 2018 6:39 am

It's not surprising - 99% of people have no idea about it, but the information is out there. As usually, everything we think we know is usually wrong ;D
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Re: Northern vs Southern arts

Postby Trick on Thu Apr 05, 2018 7:59 am

GrahamB wrote:I believe he was saying this:

Image

Ah, that must be a northern dialect that's why I couldn't understand...I'm a southerner....Sweden is a long country 8-)
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Re: Northern vs Southern arts

Postby Trick on Thu Apr 05, 2018 10:36 am

About the Shaolin-India connection I know almost about how nothing. However with my very limited research skill this popped up at the Wiki :) it says the temple was built to be the place for the Indian Buddhist Buddhabhadra's teachings. Buddhabhadra was to become the first abbot of the temple, but it also says that his two? disciples where already versed in MA before coming to study with the Indian - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Batuo Maybe he just taught them about IP and Dantian and stuff....and of course Buddhism
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Re: Northern vs Southern arts

Postby Bao on Thu Apr 05, 2018 2:17 pm

Trick wrote:but it also says that his two? disciples where already versed in MA before coming to study with the Indian - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Batuo


From another WIKI entry:
"There are historical records that Batuo's first Chinese disciples, Huiguang (慧光) and Sengchou (僧稠), both had exceptional martial skills. For example, Sengchou's skill with the tin staff is even documented in the Chinese Buddhist canon. After Buddhabadra, another Indian[7] or Tamil[8] monk, Bodhidharma (菩提达摩; Pútídámó), simply called Damo (达摩) by the Chinese, came to Shaolin in 527 AD. His Chinese disciple, Huike (慧可), was also a highly trained martial arts expert. There are implications that these first three Chinese Shaolin monks, Huiguang, Sengchou, and Huike, may have been military men before entering the monastic life."

Exactly. They were soldiers. Because the monks were lazy, they taught monks their exercises from military practice. Batuo or Bodhidharma had nothing to do with the monks physical practice. The Chinese monks and students practiced Chinese gymnastics and Chinese physical exercises. There's no Indian influence in Shaolin martial arts.

Edit: And BTW, the Swedish Chef speaks fake Norwegian, not fake Swedish. He sounds nothing like Swedish, but very much like Norwegian.
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Re: Northern vs Southern arts

Postby wayne hansen on Thu Apr 05, 2018 2:26 pm

Yes in Sweden they do call him the Norwegian chef
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Re: Northern vs Southern arts

Postby Subitai on Thu Apr 05, 2018 6:07 pm

Ok...having not been there myself, I'm not going to speculate on history. However one warning is never fully trust wiki as a credible source by itself.
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Re: Northern vs Southern arts

Postby Trick on Thu Apr 05, 2018 10:44 pm

Bao wrote:
Trick wrote:but it also says that his two? disciples where already versed in MA before coming to study with the Indian - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Batuo


From another WIKI entry:
"There are historical records that Batuo's first Chinese disciples, Huiguang (慧光) and Sengchou (僧稠), both had exceptional martial skills. For example, Sengchou's skill with the tin staff is even documented in the Chinese Buddhist canon. After Buddhabadra, another Indian[7] or Tamil[8] monk, Bodhidharma (菩提达摩; Pútídámó), simply called Damo (达摩) by the Chinese, came to Shaolin in 527 AD. His Chinese disciple, Huike (慧可), was also a highly trained martial arts expert. There are implications that these first three Chinese Shaolin monks, Huiguang, Sengchou, and Huike, may have been military men before entering the monastic life."

Exactly. They were soldiers. Because the monks were lazy, they taught monks their exercises from military practice. Batuo or Bodhidharma had nothing to do with the monks physical practice. The Chinese monks and students practiced Chinese gymnastics and Chinese physical exercises. There's no Indian influence in Shaolin martial arts.

Edit: And BTW, the Swedish Chef speaks fake Norwegian, not fake Swedish. He sounds nothing like Swedish, but very much like Norwegian.

Yes it could very well(most probably)be so that the foundation of Shaolin martial arts came from war torn military men seeking sanctuary in the temple, maybe even the Indian monks had received military training and even tasted battle before becoming monks? .............Ha, I should have suspected the "Swedish Chef" to be a Norwegian, fish balls is a delicacy in that country :o 8-)
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