Hsinchu, Taiwan

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Hsinchu, Taiwan

Postby windwalker on Fri Feb 17, 2017 4:53 pm

I will soon be relocating to Hsinchu, Taiwan. starting a small taiji group
there. For those interested you can contact me here.
Last edited by windwalker on Fri Feb 17, 2017 4:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Hsinchu, Taiwan

Postby windwalker on Sat Apr 15, 2017 3:39 am

Thought some looking for pushhands practice places / groups should they visit Taiwan
might find this place interesting.

https://goo.gl/maps/hHuUVKGxYzJ2

It's noted for groups who practice push hands, are friendly and like to push.
Visited a couple of the groups there.

The style and type of push hands is very different
from what I normally work on or with.

Others might find the type and style they practice more interesting, some of the people speak very good English
and are very approachable.

Lots of things to see in the area, along with the
food even if one is not into IMA,,,makes it a nice place to visit on anyone's list. ;)
Last edited by windwalker on Sat Apr 15, 2017 3:12 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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Re: Hsinchu, Taiwan

Postby robert on Sat Apr 22, 2017 11:28 am

I don't speak a lick of mandarin or taiwanese so I haven't pushed with anyone in the parks. I worked out at 2/28 Peace Park a few days 7 or 8 years ago and saw a couple groups in the park pushing hands. In one group the people would lean over backwards to neutralize - seems strange.
Try not to let the words confuse you — they serve no other purpose than to guide you into the inner structures of Taiji. Chen Xin
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Re: Hsinchu, Taiwan

Postby windwalker on Sat Apr 22, 2017 7:59 pm

robert wrote:I don't speak a lick of mandarin or taiwanese so I haven't pushed with anyone in the parks. I worked out at 2/28 Peace Park a few days 7 or 8 years ago and saw a couple groups in the park pushing hands. In one group the people would lean over backwards to neutralize - seems strange.


Maybe things have changed, I found them to be very open with many who do and can speak English..
Not really a big fan of ph as practiced by many there and in other places, for those who do enjoy and like
to push there are many groups with different levels and types of practices.

Some more open then others....as in all things its best to experience and evaluate
hands on....Many of the groups seemed to be very receptive to let others feel their view point
in a very direct way.

I hope anyone who has more experience with the Peace Park group will write more of their experiences there. The group usually meets at the south east corner of the park by a small pond with a bridge in an all dirt area near some public restrooms. Across the street from the park was (and probably still is) a restaurant named "California Kitchen" (or something like that). The group meets daily from 7AM-ish to 11AM-ish.
Humble guests are always welcome... Pride filled martial artists will return home humbled and dirty.

http://taichitaiwan.blogspot.tw/


Their philosophy is to compete while they are young, and save the solo form for later years. They have also been "tested" by many other groups in the park, as well as by many visitors from different counties with different forms of martial arts. One year, a member of Gracie’s family from Brazil visited the park. Respect was exchanged between the two parties and the agreement on the rules were made. After three short rounds of free style pushing, Gracie went home with dirt on his back.

http://www.wuweitaichi.com/articles/Taipei_Report.htm

This was written long ago about one of the groups in the park


The most reputable one was led by Mr. Zheng Shyan-Chi, a senior student of Grand Master Huang Sheng-Shyan. He came to the site every morning, rain or shine for a number of years. There are about 20-30 players in the group who meet regularly; their practice is mostly for the preparation of push hand tournaments in Taiwan. Under the government’s support, there are Tai Chi events almost every month around the island, with the winners being awarded with top money, such encouragement motivated this group of practitioners to train their push hands around the rules of the competition. Many young players were attracted by their seasonal Push Hand camps, coached by several ex-champs.


The group that I interacted with, the teacher Zheng Shyan-Chi, is very old now and seldom makes it the park from what I was told.
There are some senior students who carry on the tradition. For those looking to push with people of all different levels and out looks this might be a place worth checking out...They did comment positive about my own work although as I mentioned ph is not something I normally do nor train for.

These guys can, and do tend to play rough according to ones level.
Kinda makes things interesting 8-)
Last edited by windwalker on Sat Apr 22, 2017 8:18 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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Re: Hsinchu, Taiwan

Postby robert on Sun Apr 23, 2017 2:59 pm

windwalker wrote:Maybe things have changed, I found them to be very open with many who do and can speak English..
Not really a big fan of ph as practiced by many there and in other places, for those who do enjoy and like
to push there are many groups with different levels and types of practices.

Some more open then others....as in all things its best to experience and evaluate
hands on....Many of the groups seemed to be very receptive to let others feel their view point
in a very direct way.

I didn't go up to the group or try to talk to anyone, so I wouldn't disagree. From my experience I have found people in Taiwan to be very friendly. Last time I was in Taipei I was working out at Dr Sun's Memorial for a few days and there was a group there doing PHs. Next time I see people doing push hands I may see if anyone speaks some English.

windwalker wrote:The group that I interacted with, the teacher Zheng Shyan-Chi, is very old now and seldom makes it the park from what I was told.
There are some senior students who carry on the tradition. For those looking to push with people of all different levels and out looks this might be a place worth checking out...They did comment positive about my own work although as I mentioned ph is not something I normally do nor train for.

One of the groups I saw, where they weren't leaning over backwards, had an older guy who seemed to be pretty good. He seemed to be using jin and was good at taking his opponent's balance. For the most part I train on my own so I don't do much push hands, usually at workshops.
Try not to let the words confuse you — they serve no other purpose than to guide you into the inner structures of Taiji. Chen Xin
robert
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Re: Hsinchu, Taiwan

Postby windwalker on Sun Apr 23, 2017 8:01 pm

=robert"]
I didn't go up to the group or try to talk to anyone, so I wouldn't disagree. From my experience I have found people in Taiwan to be very friendly. Last time I was in Taipei I was working out at Dr Sun's Memorial for a few days and there was a group there doing PHs. Next time I see people doing push hands I may see if anyone speaks some English.


Yes they are friendly however in my experience many seem to be more cautious these days,
understanding that there are a lot of taiji "cowboys" trying to make a name as well as those trying to keep a name within the groups. From what I've read and of those I observed ph is pretty much all they do.. Which for me seems kind of pointless unless this was / is the focus of ones practice.
Humble guests are always welcome... Pride filled martial artists will return home humbled and dirty.

http://taichitaiwan.blogspot.tw/

looks like they understand about the "cowboys" ;)

I mentioned this place because often people go to places looking for a taiji group, takes a while to find them.....There its pretty much out in the open with many different groups to check out..

One of the groups I saw, where they weren't leaning over backwards, had an older guy who seemed to be pretty good. He seemed to be using jin and was good at taking his opponent's balance. For the most part I train on my own so I don't do much push hands, usually at workshops.


"jin" ;) often not a distinction that many make or can make. Changes the whole process and experience. Much of what some call pushhands I'm not interested in nor practice for.... however at any level of ones practice it can be fun to meet and feel others work....

Others who have a different view point may find the place useful..For example ph competitors, might find it a good place to get tuned up for a match.

People just visiting will find many things to see besides taiji, many good food places to eat with friendly people willing to help
a lost stranger....nice place,,,would recommend visiting for anyone traveling to Taiwan....
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Re: Hsinchu, Taiwan

Postby windwalker on Sun Sep 03, 2017 7:59 am

For those interested who happen to be in Hsinchu.

I will be establishing a practice there based on developing an understanding of
"moving with awareness" what this means, the practice, functional usage .

the practice was developed from a combination of taiji with lama hop gar basics,
giving it a unique functionality based on a wide system perspective

A “narrow” system is one that specifies a particular response for a particular attack. So for every possible attack, there is a specific response. And because there are a great many possible attacks, there are also a great may specific techniques to counter them. With “narrow” systems, you have A LOT of techniques — like the proverbial 108 hand techniques, for instance. A “wide” system has much fewer techniques, but looks to the changes possible for each of them. So for instance, you might only have 5 or 6 basic punches… but many “changes” associated with those punches. See also Baqua, with it’s emphasis on changes.

Mike Staples
.


The blog outlines my own journey into what I call emptiness a central theme of the practice.
I can be contacted here via pm or through the blog.

https://journeytoemptiness.com/2017/05/10/beginnings/

Those who might be interested are those who are in Hsinchu,
interested in a internally based practice based on traditional practices
but not tied to any one practice.
Last edited by windwalker on Sun Sep 03, 2017 10:23 am, edited 1 time in total.
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