Aiki Walk

A collection of links to internal martial arts videos. Serious martial arts videos ONLY. Joke videos go to Off the Topic.

Re: Aiki Walk

Postby Interloper on Tue May 01, 2018 10:25 am

Trick wrote:
Well it continue to help me to understand that the "second set of movement skill" belong to the secret teaching but you anyway want to tell that you and the school(dojo/teacher) you're affiliated with are in possession of this skill.....You continue to say that "The non-aiki person will develop fluid, powerful -external- movements" which sound as to contradict the "rather than "pieces" of the body in sequential chains of movement that have a beginning and an end, and then must be re-chambered or re-set."


Trick,

We are talking about a body method here, a way to develop a structure and power-generation process that are very different from conventional methods you will find in the various schools of modern Japanese karate, contemporary Chinese wushu/kungfu, muay Thai, and other external systems in which the power generation is in the techniques themselves, not in the way the body is held and managed on the "inside." "External" exercises will help build coordination, balance, muscular strength, endurance, and more, but they are working different processes than "internal" exercises, which are developing complex interplays of tensions and releases of specific muscles and sinews.

In order for a person to learn aiki, however, they have to learn to feel inside their body and find those specific muscles and sinews, before they can learn how to control and use them for this unique purpose. The pathway to that, is to first show them how to FIND those tissues by visiting the muscles and tissues they already do recognize from conventional daily use. It's kind of like, if you don't know where the public library is, but someone tells you it's a couple of blocks away from a grocery store you do know, you can find the library by going to the grocery store first, and venturing out from there. :)

It's not necessarily a "secret teaching," though some teachers hold it close to the vest.
Aiki comes from the same principles that many systems of the Chinese internal martial arts do, and if you know about those, then you understand that different Chinese schools also have varying levels of internal method themselves, and varying levels of what they can and will teach to their students. I have trained with a number of individuals from different arts that have the same basic methods and principles as the ones I train in, and they had qualities that were both similar and different -- not better or worse, just different.

Anyway, I guess the only way to make this understandable, is for you to meet and be able to feel experienced people who have at least some of these skills, whether from Chinese, Japanese or other internal arts. I get the sense that perhaps you have not, which is why no amount of verbal explanation will make this understandable, and I apologize for not being able to be clearer.
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Re: Aiki Walk

Postby klonk on Tue May 01, 2018 8:20 pm

The way zhan zhuang works is you fatigue or perhaps exhaust your obvious external muscles and, perforce, you (unconsciously) recruit secondary systems of musculature to remain upright. The unconscious mind faces the problem of you falling down and sees what else it can do.
Last edited by klonk on Tue May 01, 2018 8:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.
I define internal martial art as unusual muscle recruitment and leave it at that. If my definition is incomplete, at least it is correct so far as it goes.
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Re: Aiki Walk

Postby wayne hansen on Tue May 01, 2018 8:46 pm

Yes that is true but it is only step one
A lot more than that goes on
Don't put power into the form let it naturally arise from the form
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Re: Aiki Walk

Postby klonk on Tue May 01, 2018 8:50 pm

wayne hansen wrote:Yes that is true but it is only step one
A lot more than that goes on


Throw brick, receive jade. (Chinese proverb.)
I define internal martial art as unusual muscle recruitment and leave it at that. If my definition is incomplete, at least it is correct so far as it goes.
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Re: Aiki Walk

Postby klonk on Tue May 01, 2018 9:40 pm

I have a funny story.

I asked the sensei if his pupils stood for a long time doing nothing.

"Hai hai, they do that all the time."

"Are you telling to breathe naturally, or think of being rooted in the ground?"

"They are texting their girlfriends."
I define internal martial art as unusual muscle recruitment and leave it at that. If my definition is incomplete, at least it is correct so far as it goes.
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Re: Aiki Walk

Postby Trick on Wed May 02, 2018 1:25 am

Interloper wrote:Anyway, I guess the only way to make this understandable, is for you to meet and be able to feel experienced people who have at least some of these skills, whether from Chinese, Japanese or other internal arts. I get the sense that perhaps you have not, which is why no amount of verbal explanation will make this understandable, and I apologize for not being able to be clearer.

:) About my experiences is not what this is about. The issue i have here is about your initial kind of superoir 'thats not it but i know it but not going to show it' post in this tread.......If this Aiki is a secret so why not keep it a secret.....all out 8-) .......
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Re: Aiki Walk

Postby Yugen on Wed May 02, 2018 9:37 am

Trick wrote:
Interloper wrote:klonk,
In the majority of Japanese internal arts schools, very limited "internal" material is passed on, except to perhaps a select handful. The rest get external material -- and it may be very good, just not anything incorporating the so-called "internal qualities" of the art. In that respect, it's very much akin to the Chinese internal martial arts.

In the Japanese arts, as with the Chinese arts, who gets the skills depends on how much jikiden (direct teaching/transmission -- physical, verbal and psychological) a student receives from the teacher. Beginning students are given what would be considered "external" sets of standing and moving exercises to do which don't in themselves exercise internal mechanisms, but which start the development of neural-muscular pathways that will lead to the student being able to physically recognize, locate, and activate the internal tissues and processes necessary to make internal structure and power. By themselves, these exercises could be practiced for a lifetime and never impart anything remotely "internal" in a person; the teacher has to know how to incrementally build on, and in, the student the necessary pathways. Some students will be given this key, and move on to more sophisticated skills. The rest may become exceptionally fluid and powerful from the "skeletal" foundation exercises, but never progress beyond the overt movements and products of the beginning movements they were taught.

I don't understand this post, you say begginers exercises can lead the practitioner to get this Aiki, but you also say a practitioner need "special guidance" to get Aiki skill....A non Aiki skilled practitioner can become "exceptional fluid and powerful", so what will an Aiki skilled practitioner become then?


Trick,
Try to meet Dan Harden. Aiki is a connected body method for movement. Kata in Daito Ryu can be an expression of Aiki, but isn't always because it depends on the individual (how much work they put in). Because the kata can be an expression a student can do them for many years and just thru repetition develop some level of connected movement, but not really have Aiki, in that case it'd be just a type of jujutsu. When you receive the "special guidance" it not only starts to change how you move, but also you start "seeing" movement differently, you'll be able to see connection in others. The "special guidance" really has nothing to do with the kata specifically... i.e. you can develop an Aiki body and express it in non-martial training that is not technique based kata. For example, silk reeling exercises in CMA... they aren't martial, they're body method training. You need to actually train real fighting to try to use it at full speed... it's the constant process of peeling the onion... Like Willie's comparison video of himself, you can SEE the difference between his old video and new and how much more connection he's expressing in his movement.

In terms of secrecy of teaching... well for many of us who trained in JMA it was a recent (recent meaning the last 15 years or so) revelation that real Aiki was held in secrecy.. Guys like Dan are actually going against tradition and teaching it openly so it doesn't get lost. I've heard stories in DR where a well know instructor showed solo body training methods and the students are like "that's great, but we want to fight"... so the teacher doesn't show it again... the students don't know what to look for. In JMA there's the tradition of "steal the technique", so some students see that demonstration from the teacher and for some reason have the insight to see the purpose and how it matters to the kata... more than likely those few students are the ones who get the "special guidance"... the rest, meh... too stupid.

-As to Beebe's video... his head teeters side to side, so his walking is not from center. I've only met him once when I first started training internals.. my opinion comes from DH's guidance.
-As to Roy Goldberg, I've attended a workshop with him and Dan H. He does express Aiki in his Kata... it was asked what to look for in the one video of Roy... some of it is just balanced Yin/Yang rotation in the body. Not all kata express dantian rotation. Keep in mind that kata is not fighting. The role of Uke is to respond to the expression of Aiki. You always see that Uke stands there say after they throw a strike or grab with a stiff arm... it's because it's a technique drill. Sure for much of it Uke could just "let go" or neutralize a movement, but that's not the purpose of the kata... that's what types of sparring are for.
What Dan does with Aiki in an MMA context is much different from what Roy expresses in DR technique. From what I felt and observed, DR technique is a method for studying connection in your body with the help of a partner. Some of the techniques look silly because they're not martially real... they get drawn out as a means for study. Aiki when expressed in an MMA context are connected bursts of soft power that can be explosive, can have sticky quality and always creates kuzushi so that the opponent is always behind and vulnerable. It HAS to be like that because it fighting an opponent isn't standing there letting you perform a technique.. they're changing and responding...

-Willie... from what I've heard and understand there isn't much emphasis on Fajin in JMA internals... combatively I've been told it's considered impractical... you don't Fajin with swords or strikes, you never fully explode all your power out, in JMA there's more emphasis on always keeping some back to have that return so you can quickly transition and change combatively in response to your opponent. I guess in the context of MMA it'd be like swinging full haymakers all the time. In CMA, Fajin is a means of demonstrating you HAVE that power. I'm sure that JMA with developed dantian and internals could do the same, they just don't make it a "thing". You see dantian rotation expressed in sword, Aiki Age, Aiki Sage and throws. As you probably well know, the body gets locked and thrown the same regardless of the culture behind it, so a throwing technique in CMA does exist JMA, so the kua rotation, spiraling, Dantian rotation ends up being the "same" ... but 'same' is dependent on the skill level of the practitioner (everyone's peeling the onion).

one last thought on "it has to be felt" ... the terms like "silk realing", what is dantian and rotation, etc.. all the internal terminology... it's debatable as to what is correct because everyone has different skill levels and different traditions they're drawing from for learning it. So I avoid that and try to go and meet teachers and learn and feel what they have. More than likely they have more than I do and I'm not into teacher worship of "my master's better than yours" so I learn from them all.

my 2 cents
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Re: Aiki Walk

Postby Trick on Wed May 02, 2018 1:20 pm

Yugen wrote:Trick,
Try to meet Dan Harden. Aiki is a connected body method for movement. Kata in Daito Ryu can be an expression of Aiki, but isn't always because it depends on the individual (how much work they put in). Because the kata can be an expression a student can do them for many years and just thru repetition develop some level of connected movement, but not really have Aiki, in that case it'd be just a type of jujutsu. When you receive the "special guidance" it not only starts to change how you move, but also you start "seeing" movement differently, you'll be able to see connection in others. The "special guidance" really has nothing to do with the kata specifically... i.e. you can develop an Aiki body and express it in non-martial training that is not technique based kata. For example, silk reeling exercises in CMA... they aren't martial, they're body method training. You need to actually train real fighting to try to use it at full speed... it's the constant process of peeling the onion... Like Willie's comparison video of himself, you can SEE the difference between his old video and new and how much more connection he's expressing in his movement.

In terms of secrecy of teaching... well for many of us who trained in JMA it was a recent (recent meaning the last 15 years or so) revelation that real Aiki was held in secrecy.. Guys like Dan are actually going against tradition and teaching it openly so it doesn't get lost. I've heard stories in DR where a well know instructor showed solo body training methods and the students are like "that's great, but we want to fight"... so the teacher doesn't show it again... the students don't know what to look for. In JMA there's the tradition of "steal the technique", so some students see that demonstration from the teacher and for some reason have the insight to see the purpose and how it matters to the kata... more than likely those few students are the ones who get the "special guidance"... the rest, meh... too stupid.

-As to Beebe's video... his head teeters side to side, so his walking is not from center. I've only met him once when I first started training internals.. my opinion comes from DH's guidance.
-As to Roy Goldberg, I've attended a workshop with him and Dan H. He does express Aiki in his Kata... it was asked what to look for in the one video of Roy... some of it is just balanced Yin/Yang rotation in the body. Not all kata express dantian rotation. Keep in mind that kata is not fighting. The role of Uke is to respond to the expression of Aiki. You always see that Uke stands there say after they throw a strike or grab with a stiff arm... it's because it's a technique drill. Sure for much of it Uke could just "let go" or neutralize a movement, but that's not the purpose of the kata... that's what types of sparring are for.
What Dan does with Aiki in an MMA context is much different from what Roy expresses in DR technique. From what I felt and observed, DR technique is a method for studying connection in your body with the help of a partner. Some of the techniques look silly because they're not martially real... they get drawn out as a means for study. Aiki when expressed in an MMA context are connected bursts of soft power that can be explosive, can have sticky quality and always creates kuzushi so that the opponent is always behind and vulnerable. It HAS to be like that because it fighting an opponent isn't standing there letting you perform a technique.. they're changing and responding...

-Willie... from what I've heard and understand there isn't much emphasis on Fajin in JMA internals... combatively I've been told it's considered impractical... you don't Fajin with swords or strikes, you never fully explode all your power out, in JMA there's more emphasis on always keeping some back to have that return so you can quickly transition and change combatively in response to your opponent. I guess in the context of MMA it'd be like swinging full haymakers all the time. In CMA, Fajin is a means of demonstrating you HAVE that power. I'm sure that JMA with developed dantian and internals could do the same, they just don't make it a "thing". You see dantian rotation expressed in sword, Aiki Age, Aiki Sage and throws. As you probably well know, the body gets locked and thrown the same regardless of the culture behind it, so a throwing technique in CMA does exist JMA, so the kua rotation, spiraling, Dantian rotation ends up being the "same" ... but 'same' is dependent on the skill level of the practitioner (everyone's peeling the onion).

one last thought on "it has to be felt" ... the terms like "silk realing", what is dantian and rotation, etc.. all the internal terminology... it's debatable as to what is correct because everyone has different skill levels and different traditions they're drawing from for learning it. So I avoid that and try to go and meet teachers and learn and feel what they have. More than likely they have more than I do and I'm not into teacher worship of "my master's better than yours" so I learn from them all.

my 2 cents
thank you for this informative explaination, and it's kind of inline with my own thoughts on the subject,that will say as for example with Aikido one will develop "Aiki"skill from the regular practice that's goin on in a Dojo whether it's Yoshinkan,Tomiki, Aikikai, Iwama, Nishio, and so on, as long one study under competent instructors. And for the exercise explained in the link in the OP probably helps the Aiki seekers on there way too, the initial(in the thread)dissing of it was just from a rival school of Aikijutsu8-) .......The subject of fajin/fali I agree that this practice method is often used as a demonstration/show off of power, just that when the Show off side of it is done in thin air it show little of power. And yes JMA do practice and demonstrate fajin too, Karate that I'm familiar with comes to mind, and Shorinji Kempo too to take an example from your own list of MA's practiced, yes I understand for many and especially CMA's practitioners Kime is considered a far cry from the Fajin of CMA but that's not how I see it and experienced it.....
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Re: Aiki Walk

Postby Yugen on Wed May 02, 2018 2:16 pm

Trick wrote:
Yugen wrote:Trick,
Try to meet Dan Harden. Aiki is a connected body method for movement. Kata in Daito Ryu can be an expression of Aiki, but isn't always because it depends on the individual (how much work they put in). Because the kata can be an expression a student can do them for many years and just thru repetition develop some level of connected movement, but not really have Aiki, in that case it'd be just a type of jujutsu. When you receive the "special guidance" it not only starts to change how you move, but also you start "seeing" movement differently, you'll be able to see connection in others. The "special guidance" really has nothing to do with the kata specifically... i.e. you can develop an Aiki body and express it in non-martial training that is not technique based kata. For example, silk reeling exercises in CMA... they aren't martial, they're body method training. You need to actually train real fighting to try to use it at full speed... it's the constant process of peeling the onion... Like Willie's comparison video of himself, you can SEE the difference between his old video and new and how much more connection he's expressing in his movement.

In terms of secrecy of teaching... well for many of us who trained in JMA it was a recent (recent meaning the last 15 years or so) revelation that real Aiki was held in secrecy.. Guys like Dan are actually going against tradition and teaching it openly so it doesn't get lost. I've heard stories in DR where a well know instructor showed solo body training methods and the students are like "that's great, but we want to fight"... so the teacher doesn't show it again... the students don't know what to look for. In JMA there's the tradition of "steal the technique", so some students see that demonstration from the teacher and for some reason have the insight to see the purpose and how it matters to the kata... more than likely those few students are the ones who get the "special guidance"... the rest, meh... too stupid.

-As to Beebe's video... his head teeters side to side, so his walking is not from center. I've only met him once when I first started training internals.. my opinion comes from DH's guidance.
-As to Roy Goldberg, I've attended a workshop with him and Dan H. He does express Aiki in his Kata... it was asked what to look for in the one video of Roy... some of it is just balanced Yin/Yang rotation in the body. Not all kata express dantian rotation. Keep in mind that kata is not fighting. The role of Uke is to respond to the expression of Aiki. You always see that Uke stands there say after they throw a strike or grab with a stiff arm... it's because it's a technique drill. Sure for much of it Uke could just "let go" or neutralize a movement, but that's not the purpose of the kata... that's what types of sparring are for.
What Dan does with Aiki in an MMA context is much different from what Roy expresses in DR technique. From what I felt and observed, DR technique is a method for studying connection in your body with the help of a partner. Some of the techniques look silly because they're not martially real... they get drawn out as a means for study. Aiki when expressed in an MMA context are connected bursts of soft power that can be explosive, can have sticky quality and always creates kuzushi so that the opponent is always behind and vulnerable. It HAS to be like that because it fighting an opponent isn't standing there letting you perform a technique.. they're changing and responding...

-Willie... from what I've heard and understand there isn't much emphasis on Fajin in JMA internals... combatively I've been told it's considered impractical... you don't Fajin with swords or strikes, you never fully explode all your power out, in JMA there's more emphasis on always keeping some back to have that return so you can quickly transition and change combatively in response to your opponent. I guess in the context of MMA it'd be like swinging full haymakers all the time. In CMA, Fajin is a means of demonstrating you HAVE that power. I'm sure that JMA with developed dantian and internals could do the same, they just don't make it a "thing". You see dantian rotation expressed in sword, Aiki Age, Aiki Sage and throws. As you probably well know, the body gets locked and thrown the same regardless of the culture behind it, so a throwing technique in CMA does exist JMA, so the kua rotation, spiraling, Dantian rotation ends up being the "same" ... but 'same' is dependent on the skill level of the practitioner (everyone's peeling the onion).

one last thought on "it has to be felt" ... the terms like "silk realing", what is dantian and rotation, etc.. all the internal terminology... it's debatable as to what is correct because everyone has different skill levels and different traditions they're drawing from for learning it. So I avoid that and try to go and meet teachers and learn and feel what they have. More than likely they have more than I do and I'm not into teacher worship of "my master's better than yours" so I learn from them all.

my 2 cents
thank you for this informative explaination, and it's kind of inline with my own thoughts on the subject,that will say as for example with Aikido one will develop "Aiki"skill from the regular practice that's goin on in a Dojo whether it's Yoshinkan,Tomiki, Aikikai, Iwama, Nishio, and so on, as long one study under competent instructors. And for the exercise explained in the link in the OP probably helps the Aiki seekers on there way too, the initial(in the thread)dissing of it was just from a rival school of Aikijutsu8-) .......The subject of fajin/fali I agree that this practice method is often used as a demonstration/show off of power, just that when the Show off side of it is done in thin air it show little of power. And yes JMA do practice and demonstrate fajin too, Karate that I'm familiar with comes to mind, and Shorinji Kempo too to take an example from your own list of MA's practiced, yes I understand for many and especially CMA's practitioners Kime is considered a far cry from the Fajin of CMA but that's not how I see it and experienced it.....


I had only watch about the first 5 minutes of Allen's video... Allen does get better keeping his head movement from teetering later on. The walking he's having his student do at the 13:00 mark I would personally not do. I don't know if it has any purpose in JMA weapons, but from an MMA/grappling perspective it doesn't look healthy to me... looks damaging to the knees. (I'm 46 still doing Judo and used internals training to fully heal a bulging disc back injury)... Walk and move like a human. Allen was a direct student of Shirata Rinjiro and knows more than me about the Aiki arts so I'm sure it's used somewhere in their technique.
Last edited by Yugen on Wed May 02, 2018 2:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Aiki Walk

Postby Yugen on Wed May 02, 2018 2:31 pm

Interloper wrote:The issue I have with videos like the ones in the OP, is they do not explain their purpose; show any practical results of such exercises, show their applications, or provide any real context for doing what they're doing.

Allen's whole blog is about explaining what he learned from Shirata, how he defines what Aiki is and the body training methods he learned from Shirata. It doesn't get much clearer than that!
Last edited by Yugen on Wed May 02, 2018 2:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Aiki Walk

Postby Yugen on Wed May 02, 2018 3:18 pm

willie wrote:
Interloper wrote:
Trick wrote:Do you have Aiki? If so, what exercises do you recommend ?


Aiki is just the Japanese term for the ability to use internal mechanics to manipulate an opponent's center of mass and force him to merge with the movements of your own body... the difference between you and the opponent being that you are in complete control of what you are doing, and his body is like a puppet, forced to move in mirror to your motions, and to receive the brunt of the force those movements generate. Its processes share the same basic principles and concepts of some Chinese internal martial arts.

I have been training and exploring it for 20 years, at this point. Learning it is like a spiral: you start with a certain understanding and command of the principles and the concepts, and over time you keep coming back to the same principles, but they keep taking on more layers of meaning. So, you can "have aiki," and you can "have aiki"... and what that means, is that you keep getting more of those layers, but you never feel you're close to the pinnacle of where you could be going with it.



The issue I have with videos like the ones in the OP, is they do not explain their purpose; show any practical results of such exercises, show their applications.

It's worth the investment to do direct, focused, guided training.


I like your writing, but it is diffecult to grasp the overlap?
I'm purposely avoiding the other woo woo video's that I seen, because we all know where that goes already.
So, could you tell me about this one?


Willie,
I'll give it a shot. So I don't call myself an "Aikido" guy and don't list it in my bio, but I have trained it. I've done quite a few years in Nihon Goshin Aikido... I've also trained at a branch affiliated with Shinshin Toistu Aikido, I've trained with Haruo Matsuoka, Bruce Bookman and attended some Takumakai Daito Ryu classes and other DR guys workshops... but honestly I know enough to totally misrepresent it!

My description is based on how I would approach performing the technique.

for the opening technique when Uke grabs, Tori (Roy in this case) should be turning the torso with balanced yin/yang... the usual correction if rotation is not balanced.... put your intent on ming-men leading the turn ... ming-men doesn't actually lead but that usually starts to develop that balance so that the front of the torso and the back are moving in unison around the axis line that is the spine. That balanced rotation also requires using the legs properly (i.e. bowing and gravity drop) so that a lateral imbalance doesn't occur. Simultaneously there is rising up the back and drop down the front (ideally powered by dantian rotation. In this case I'd rotate dantian from my right shoulder down towards my left kua. The combined movements and gravity drop should ideally create an adhesion of Uke's grip to Tori's chest and hence propel them over. Also with intent I don't try to "do" the throw on Uke, focus the intent to move one's self... lastly... I personally would be training this slowly with an Uke who has some internals to provide the proper feedback that is ukemi... not saying Roy should... I'm saying I'd screw it up going fast.
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Re: Aiki Walk

Postby Yugen on Wed May 02, 2018 3:35 pm

willie wrote:
jaime_g wrote:Really good daito ryu uses silk reeling and dantian

Cool, do you have any video's of silk reeling and dantian usage from early Aikijujutsu, as proof?

To me higher level dantian usage is a bit complex to even speak about, but it is not simply turning the body or just
connecting the upper and lower body as described in a different thread.

higher lever dantian use is the ability to create explosive power in the form of fajin. This requires extensive guidance to acquire.
It requires that all area's of taichi are there first.
You must have qi or it is not fajin, it would be more like fali.
You must use the bows of the body in correct timing with the dantain.
You must be able to augment/ovalize and create bows in the area of the dantian.
You must be able to gather energy.
You must be able to use your internal organs to power the art. "this is the highest level of internal"
This is taichi.

The dantian is the engine. The form just an extension/expression of that power.
This is me practicing Xinja. You should be able to see the augmentation/gathering phase just before the jin is released.



For the purpose of comparison, I added this very old video of me before I had higher level dantian usage or short power.

The reason why I posted these video's is because interlooper had stated the higher level usage of the dantian, which is not
apparent in "None" of the Aikijujutsu video's that i have seen so far.
In-fact there is ton's of broken/un-powered applications in all of those video's.
Not that this is a Problem, some arts are powered like that.
Thanks


Willie,

Your explanation of higher level dantian (which I do not have) I agree with in that I've felt someone who can express all of what you said.
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Re: Aiki Walk

Postby Interloper on Wed May 02, 2018 5:33 pm

"High level dantian" doesn't just refer to the store-and-release that creates powerful fajin in Chen style tai chi and some other internal Chinese arts; it also involves the ability to draw inward, to suction and redirect force to the ground on contact, and to make rapid pulse Yin/Yang (In/Yo) exchanges with mingmen/meimon.

I have not observed dantian use (as I described it above) in any aikijujutsu system except Hontai Hakkei Ryu AJJ, and I suspect that the art's founder had more than a passing acquaintance with some Chinese internal practitioners. A lot of what Salahuddin Muhammad Sensei is doing in his videos is very powerful and subtle use of tanden as well as other In (Yin) tissues employed together with tanden. This, in combination with the complementary use of meimon (mingmen). It's something not visible in overt movement.

Aikijujutsu systems that have aiki, tend to use the meimon for most of what they do, where in Chinese arts there would be a "Yin" way and a "Yang" way to do something, these JIMA systems seem to focus on the "Yang." Tanden seems to play a lesser role, though it is used as a counterbalance to meimon in aiki-sage and other mechanisms.

I did not feel any nuanced, refined use of tanden-ho from any Japanese practitioner (except for some basic absorbing skills from one), until I met Muhammad Sensei. The only other case in which I have felt that usage, is in Zhong Xin Dao I Liq Chuan. which is why I do believe that it is Chinese in provenance and that those who do have tanden/dantian skills (besides storing for fajin), had gone outside of Japanese internal arts to find them.
Last edited by Interloper on Wed May 02, 2018 6:42 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Aiki Walk

Postby Interloper on Wed May 02, 2018 5:41 pm

Yugen wrote:
Interloper wrote:The issue I have with videos like the ones in the OP, is they do not explain their purpose; show any practical results of such exercises, show their applications, or provide any real context for doing what they're doing.

Allen's whole blog is about explaining what he learned from Shirata, how he defines what Aiki is and the body training methods he learned from Shirata. It doesn't get much clearer than that!


Well yes, if you read the blog before watching the videos, then that would make things clear. But we were presented with a video with no context.
Last edited by Interloper on Wed May 02, 2018 5:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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