Meet the Women Worried About #MeToo

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Re: Meet the Women Worried About #MeToo

Postby Steve James on Sun Feb 18, 2018 5:44 pm

Right. From the "grievance studies department" (i.e., the people in that department). Is that an ad hominem?
Anyway, Google "appeal to experience" --not that it has anything to do with any argument.

Grievance studies :) You mean philosophy.
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Re: Meet the Women Worried About #MeToo

Postby klonk on Mon Feb 19, 2018 5:03 am

Grievance studies :) You mean philosophy.

Not so far off the mark! :)
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Re: Meet the Women Worried About #MeToo

Postby Michael on Mon Apr 09, 2018 4:18 am

Following several high profile rape cases that have collapsed in the UK because police and prosecutors failed to share evidence that would exhonerate the accused, often text messages and photos that proved consensual sex, evidence that in some cases appears to have been hidden by police up until the moment of trial, the Metropolitan police have decided to change their policy of "automatically believing victims of rape":

Scotland Yard Commissioner Cressida Dick wrote:The UK’s biggest police force is to ditch a policy of believing all rape complainants following a series of embarrassing failures into alleged sex crimes, The Times reports.

Cressida Dick, the Metropolitan Police commissioner, has told officers to have an open mind when an allegation is made and countenance the possibility that a crime was not committed.

“You start with a completely open mind, absolutely,” she said. “It is very important to victims to feel that they are going to be believed. Our default position is we are, of course, likely to believe you but we are investigators and we have to investigate.”


A dossier has been reported on that shows the police using the hiding of evidence as a tactic for prosecution, contrary to the facility for secrecy, which is meant for purposes of national security or to hide the identity of an undercover police officer, not to avoid disclosure in a sexual assault prosecution.

The Times reports: Police are ‘trained to hide vital evidence’ wrote:A dossier seen by The Times reveals a commonly held view that the defence is not entitled to see all the evidence. It discloses the tactics used to stop it being handed over, with officers in at least one force apparently trained in how to avoid making available material that might undermine their case.


The Daily Mail reports: Police are 'trained to deliberately hide evidence they don't want defence to see' wrote:Documents show how police and prosecutors employ certain tactics to stop defence teams from seeing materials that could help their client during their trial.

One ploy used by police is to put evidence 'on the MG6D', which refers to a list of sensitive unused material which a defendant's legal team does not have access to.

Examples of legitimate materials which may be put on the MG6D include those relating to the interest of national security or information about an undercover officer.

According to The Times, the dossier is compiled from reports of 14 focus groups of police officers, judges and prosecutors.

More than 900 suspects had charges dropped last year because police and prosecutors failed to hand evidence to defence lawyers.


One case had been going on for over two years and finally, after three days of trial, when the prosecution finally discovered evidence the police investigator had failed to report that would have proven the victim a liar, officials apologized to the accused.

The Telegraph reports: Met Police apologises over collapsed Liam Allan rape trial wrote:A total of 600 sex cases are under urgent review as it emerges that a catalogue of errors by a single detective mean a student is in line for a £100,000 payout after he was wrongly charged with rape.

The Metropolitan Police and senior lawyers have personally apologised to Liam Allan, 22, after he spent nearly two years on bail and endured three days on trial before it was discovered his accuser had pestered him for “casual sex”.

The case triggered a review of 600 “live” rape and sex assault cases by the force and thousands more across the country with “some” giving cause for concern. And since Mr Allan’s case came to light at least three other rape trials collapsed over police failings to disclose key information to defence lawyers.

The Met’s Commander Richard Smith and Claire Lindley, chief crown prosecutor for London South, told a press conference that they had met with Mr Allan to apologise for the errors.


The current guidelines were put in place in 2011 following revelations about sexual assaults by people like Jimmy Saville.

The Daily Mail reports: Cressida Dick of Scotland Yard changes policy wrote:Guidelines that instructed officers to believe alleged victims automatically were put in place following revelations in 2011 that abuse accusations – including those made against Jimmy Savile – had not been properly investigated. However the Met later faced fierce criticism when it revealed that uncorroborated allegations of a Westminster sex abuse ring from a man known only as 'Nick' were 'credible and true.'

She told the newspaper: 'Speaking as a cop, opposed to a citizen, I'm interested in crime. If it's a long time ago, or it's very trivial, or I'm not likely to get a criminal justice outcome, I'm not going to spend a lot of resources on it.

'And what might be a misunderstanding between two people, clumsy behaviour between somebody who fancies somebody else, is not a matter for the police.'


The Times reports wrote:A national policy was put in place in 2011, following the Jimmy Savile revelations, which instructed officers to believe alleged victims, with the intention of encouraging complainants to come forward.

In 2016, however, Sir Richard Henriques, a retired judge who identified failings in Operation Midland, called for the policy to be withdrawn as it undermined the presumption of innocence.
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Re: Meet the Women Worried About #MeToo

Postby Michael on Mon Apr 09, 2018 4:23 am

Sexual assault victims are vulnerable before and after the crime and I think it's difficult for police to protect them and still maintain the presumption of innocence for the accused, but the Metropolitan Police have changed their policy after seeing that giving up this important legal principle is untenable and results in faulty prosecution of the innocent.
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