Interview series with Jarek Szymanski

Discussion on the three big Chinese internals, Yiquan, Bajiquan, Piguazhang and other similar styles.

Re: Interview series with Jarek Szymanski

Postby edededed on Thu Dec 06, 2018 1:00 am

"Xiao" as in small? Is Wu Maogui short? :D I forget who told me - but I heard that he had few students originally, did not have much of a livelihood; later, when some "demand" for tongbei appeared, things took a better turn for him! Which was good.

Always a shame when great masters are not appreciated!
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Re: Interview series with Jarek Szymanski

Postby Jarek on Thu Dec 06, 2018 1:14 am

edededed wrote:"Xiao" as in small? Is Wu Maogui short? :D I forget who told me - but I heard that he had few students originally, did not have much of a livelihood; later, when some "demand" for tongbei appeared, things took a better turn for him! Which was good.

Always a shame when great masters are not appreciated!


Not really short, just relatively young. He worked at the same factory as late Master Bao and my brother, practiced hard, additionally learnt Tuishou from Chu Guiting, who was in good relations with his teacher. I do not know how he did earlier, later on he had quite a few foreign students, but I think he quit teaching as - from what I hear - his health has deteriorated (serious heart problems). I met him only twice, master Bao did not encourage his students to train together, he would always teach us one on one. Old school.
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Re: Interview series with Jarek Szymanski

Postby Bao on Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:33 am

Jarek wrote:Bao,
I've been in China for over 28 years now - and in all this time met many teachers, and learnt from those I had most respect for. They are all gone now, all of them. My Bagua teacher was the oldest of all, and he was the one I learnt first from; next one was XYLHQ teacher, so studying Bagua and Xinyi overlapped, however one was in southern Jiangsu, and I could only study when either I travelled there or when he came over to stay with me in Shanghai. On the weekly basis I would study XYLHQ, because the teacher was in Shanghai, and he became like a second father to me. Then I was lucky to meet and learn from a Tongbei teacher - but it took only a couple of years before he passed away. I left TJQ as the last system to study as the teacher was the youngest of all of them - but he passed away last year... So some choices were mine, some were just destiny and life. I did not want to miss the opportunities to learn from great teachers, but I agree that focusing on one system under one teacher, patiently digging into the deeper layers of skill and not starting from scratch - which is necessity when you begin with a new style - is more efficient.


Thanks Jarek for yr reply. Must feel sad now but also as a great privilege to have met them and studied for them. I would have lived for a longer time in China and studied more there if I could chose. But yes, life takes us on different journeys. You must have a lot of fascinating stories to share. 8-)

/David
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- Storms make oaks take deeper root. -George Herbert
- To affect the quality of the day, is the highest of all arts! -Walden Thoreau
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Re: Interview series with Jarek Szymanski

Postby edededed on Thu Dec 06, 2018 3:34 pm

Jarek, maybe you can visit him again! Not to learn anything, just as a friendly brother perhaps. Old school is restrictive sometimes!

I think tongbei was not called highly in China; luckily later on foreigners became quite interested!

I think that you were in China during a very interesting time, a real opportunity. Also have been enjoying the interview (thanks to Jon for writing it up!)
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Re: Interview series with Jarek Szymanski

Postby Jarek on Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:54 pm

David, Ed, for an unknown reason the message I've been writing disappeared in the virtual universe... :(

Anyway, it's been a long ride over all those years, with MA as the main theme, meeting people and learning, missing new trends and opportunities that in the meantime the western world has been offering. Many thanks to Jon for his patience, we have been having fun talking about MA and China in general, and somehow the interview has grown out of these casual conversations. I'm glad you like it, kudos to Jon, who's also not only a MA scholar but also a very dedicated practitioner. I'm sure each of us has many interesting stories to tell, and I hope you could share them too - it's all a part of the unique culture of CMA. Just like this board and late D. DeVere's efforts are a part of history, our personal (hi)stories too.

Cheers to you gents,

Jarek
Last edited by Jarek on Thu Dec 06, 2018 10:55 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Interview series with Jarek Szymanski

Postby edededed on Fri Dec 07, 2018 6:57 am

CMA is full of interesting stories!

I would like to add - despite your not teaching (yet), you have had a significant influence via your website, leading many to learn (often rare) CMA, I think! (I was one of them, too.) Jon's sites have or will have a similar effect I think as well! Really great of you guys to share your stories. (And of course this board has had a long influence as well.)
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Re: Interview series with Jarek Szymanski

Postby retreats108 on Fri Dec 07, 2018 2:20 pm

Thanks to both Jarek and Jon for these interviews and your websites, great work in the virtual realm and both lovely, helpful guys in real life !
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