The advantage of hand coordinate with foot landing

Discussion on the three big Chinese internals, Yiquan, Bajiquan, Piguazhang and other similar styles.

Re: The advantage of hand coordinate with foot landing

Postby klonk on Tue Jun 26, 2018 10:41 pm

Steve James wrote:Do you step every time you punch?


Why yes, by preference. Force is mass accelerated. As to what to do when in too close or stuck in a corner, what Trick said.


Trick wrote:
Steve James wrote:Do you step every time you punch?

One could maybe say the mechanics of stepping is there even if punching from an stationary stance, pushing with the feet’s (a forward and backward push) against the ground, slightly dropping and rebounding in the knees(maybe not done while stepping)
I define internal martial art as unusual muscle recruitment and leave it at that. If my definition is incomplete, at least it is correct so far as it goes.
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Re: The advantage of hand coordinate with foot landing

Postby klonk on Tue Jun 26, 2018 11:53 pm

I feel I should say one more thing about stepping and punching. If you manage to punch someone while he is stepping toward you, that is "borrowing the opponent's force and using his strength against him" as it pertains to punching arts. Don't get hit that way...
I define internal martial art as unusual muscle recruitment and leave it at that. If my definition is incomplete, at least it is correct so far as it goes.
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Re: The advantage of hand coordinate with foot landing

Postby marvin8 on Wed Jun 27, 2018 2:47 pm

klonk wrote:Then something weird and interesting happens, the hip and shoulders torque as the weight descends to the left foot. So it is weight transfer, weight drop and body torque all at once. The nearest Eastern analog that comes to mind is the double hip punch (Consterdine Special), for in both cases there is a rotary momentum around the left leg, but the boxing cross is more compact and, obviously, well integrated into the rest of boxing's system of movements.

Starting @ 6:20, Peter explains he uses his front planted foot as a hinge, leads with the double hip to create momentum, then shoulder (lag) to generate power. However, Peter does not use the whole kinetic chain punch.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yrmek6Ey9v8&t=6m20s
The first hip action by itself is not necessary.

This Mike Tyson vs Francois Botha clip is used to give a rough description of a kinetic chain punch sequence. Note that Mike's jab, slipping (defensive move) and loading of right rear hip takes the place of Consterdine's first hip action:
Image

Mike has excellent separation between his stages of the kinetic chain. Mike takes small steps towards Botha. He feints a left jab (ward off) drawing Botha to slip inside and counter with an overhand right (typical counter to jab). This brings Mike's shoulders to a 90 degree angle to Botha. Mike slips (yields) to the right (loading his rear right hip by closing it), avoiding Botha's potential overhand right. Before Mike touches his left foot down he rotates his hips, transferring his weight to his left front hip. After he has rotated his hips a full 90 degrees, he then rotates his shoulders. After he rotates his shoulders a full 90 degrees and finally releases his punch.

Less successful boxers tend to rotate their hips and shoulders together.

klonk wrote:
Steve James wrote:Do you step every time you punch?


Why yes, by preference. Force is mass accelerated. As to what to do when in too close or stuck in a corner, what Trick said.


Trick wrote:
Steve James wrote:Do you step every time you punch?

One could maybe say the mechanics of stepping is there even if punching from an stationary stance, pushing with the feet’s (a forward and backward push) against the ground, slightly dropping and rebounding in the knees(maybe not done while stepping)

No. By using bending/unbending the knees your taking momentum away from the opponent. If you were to jump in the air, then punch "during your foot landing," you would lose horizontal momentum to the ground.

Starting at 2:13, Wee Kee Jin yields, loads his rear hip, and releases . Mike used the same concept by creating the incoming force (feint), slipping, then punching.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E4dTHI8zgnA&t=2m13s

klonk wrote:I feel I should say one more thing about stepping and punching. If you manage to punch someone while he is stepping toward you, that is "borrowing the opponent's force and using his strength against him" as it pertains to punching arts. Don't get hit that way...

Yes. In the above clip, Mike drew Botha towards him (by drawing a counter to his jab) before KOing him.
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