Punching/blocking drill

Discussion on the three big Chinese internals, Yiquan, Bajiquan, Piguazhang and other similar styles.

Re: Punching/blocking drill

Postby MaartenSFS on Wed Apr 08, 2020 8:39 am

Just because I said that I wasn't impressed with this one drill doesn't mean that his whole system is bad or that he couldn't fight. There is no such thing as a perfect system and there are many examples of founders with amazing skills and not a single skilled practitioner alive today. Also, telivision crews have filmed A LOT of bullshit over the years. This doesn't lend it the slightest bit or credibility. I had a documentary made about me in China. That must mean that I'm one of the foremost authorities on CMA of my generation, can fly and kill people with my ferocious anal wind technique!
User avatar
MaartenSFS
Wuji
 
Posts: 2233
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2013 8:22 pm
Location: Lansing, Michigan

Re: Punching/blocking drill

Postby marvin8 on Thu Apr 09, 2020 8:36 am

johnwang wrote:I prefer to move in circle toward my opponent's blind side and away from his back hand.

Image

I thought you prefer to block from inside out. Did your strategies change?

johnwang wrote:I try to use only 2 strategies to deal with all punches.

1. Rhino guard - close the front door, open both side doors, invite opponent's punch to come through both side doors.
1. Chinese zombie guard - close both side doors, open the front door, invite opponent's punch to come through the front door.

Since both strategies exist in neither CMA nor non-CMA, I just have to create it myself.


Your feeder is fighting southpaw when a majority of people are orthodox (throw right hand from rear). Grapplers tend to stand southpaw. It's beneficial to add a drill with how most people fight. Your parry is down and extended away from your face--which is a reaction boxers create to KO you, like this:

Image

Yes, partner drills are better than no partner drills. However, it depends on how you do those partner drills, as others mentioned.
User avatar
marvin8
Wuji
 
Posts: 2061
Joined: Mon Mar 02, 2009 8:30 pm

Re: Punching/blocking drill

Postby johnwang on Thu Apr 09, 2020 10:06 am

marvin8 wrote:I thought you prefer to block from inside out. Did your strategies change?

Both strategies are needed.

1. Protect center from inside out.
2. Protect center from outside in.
Last edited by johnwang on Thu Apr 09, 2020 11:44 am, edited 1 time in total.
I'm still allergic to "push".
User avatar
johnwang
Great Old One
 
Posts: 9460
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 5:26 pm

Re: Punching/blocking drill

Postby johnwang on Sun Apr 19, 2020 12:15 pm

Here is a "rhino guard" test clip. It proves that "rhino guard" has value in combat.

The testing rule is simple:

- If A can punch on B's head, A wins that round.
- If B can use rhino guard to achieve a head lock, B wins that round.\

No time limit. test it for 15 rounds, and record the result.

Image
Last edited by johnwang on Sun Apr 19, 2020 12:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
I'm still allergic to "push".
User avatar
johnwang
Great Old One
 
Posts: 9460
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 5:26 pm

Re: Punching/blocking drill

Postby MaartenSFS on Sun Apr 19, 2020 1:53 pm

My Master uses that same guard, but in striking situations. Works great for him but I was never able to make use of it. Probably because I'm too tall.
User avatar
MaartenSFS
Wuji
 
Posts: 2233
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2013 8:22 pm
Location: Lansing, Michigan

Re: Punching/blocking drill

Postby johnwang on Sun Apr 19, 2020 2:28 pm

MaartenSFS wrote:My Master uses that same guard, but in striking situations. Works great for him but I was never able to make use of it. Probably because I'm too tall.

Rhino guard is easier used by a tall person with longer arms.

In the following clip, you can see that the moment that your opponent starts to dodge and move around, the fight can take a long time. This is why I like the strategy - When your opponent attacks you, if you attack him at the same time. Either you win, or you lose. It's just as simple as that.

Image
I'm still allergic to "push".
User avatar
johnwang
Great Old One
 
Posts: 9460
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 5:26 pm

Re: Punching/blocking drill

Postby dspyrido on Sun Apr 19, 2020 5:44 pm

johnwang wrote:Image


Is this just an exercise?

I feel you guys hold this for too long so that it is open to double leg, kicks to the legs, body shots etc.

As a push to force distance & enable recovery then it makes sense but not to hold, rush in & keep leaving the arms out.
User avatar
dspyrido
Wuji
 
Posts: 2312
Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2009 5:03 am

Re: Punching/blocking drill

Postby johnwang on Sun Apr 19, 2020 9:32 pm

dspyrido wrote:Is this just an exercise?

I feel you guys hold this for too long so that it is open to double leg, kicks to the legs, body shots etc.

As a push to force distance & enable recovery then it makes sense but not to hold, rush in & keep leaving the arms out.

It's a test.

- Double legs (general wrestling),
- Kicks to the legs (leg catching),
- body shots (we only train head punch, we don't train body punch that much).

are trained in different section and different time.

I have told all my students that if they have learned "head lock" and "single leg", they can leave and find themselves another CMA teacher. So how to establish a head lock, and how to obtain leading leg are heavily trained within my guys. During the single leg training, kicking to the leg (catch kicking leg) is seriously trained.
Last edited by johnwang on Sun Apr 19, 2020 9:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
I'm still allergic to "push".
User avatar
johnwang
Great Old One
 
Posts: 9460
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 5:26 pm

Re: Punching/blocking drill

Postby johnwang on Mon Apr 20, 2020 1:17 pm

Testing, testing, and more testing. Is that what we have heard on TV everyday?

Besides general testing, the special testing is also important. In the following clip. the testing rule is:

- If A can punch on B's head, A wins that round.
- If B can obtain a head lock on A before A's punch can land on B's head, B wins that rounds.

In this test, the result is 3-0 and B wins.

Image

I have always believed that you may repeat partner drill 10,000 times, but without testing, that technique is still not yours.

Image
I'm still allergic to "push".
User avatar
johnwang
Great Old One
 
Posts: 9460
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 5:26 pm

Re: Punching/blocking drill

Postby dspyrido on Mon Apr 20, 2020 4:02 pm

Testing is good. Very good.

Do you test the reaction?

Opponent is allowed to

- double leg as well once the rhino has started?
- kick to the legs once it's started?
- etc

Btw the finger clasp - isn't it slow, a tell sign and also can even hurt the fingers if caught?

Wouldn't a long guard (where the elbows are bent 135 degrees or more) work faster and be more flexible? With the long guard you can just make a fist and punch it up and through to the head.
Last edited by dspyrido on Mon Apr 20, 2020 4:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
dspyrido
Wuji
 
Posts: 2312
Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2009 5:03 am

Re: Punching/blocking drill

Postby johnwang on Mon Apr 20, 2020 4:56 pm

dspyrido wrote:Testing is good. Very good.

Do you test the reaction?

Opponent is allowed to

- double leg as well once the rhino has started?
- kick to the legs once it's started?
- etc

Btw the finger clasp - isn't it slow, a tell sign and also can even hurt the fingers if caught?

Wouldn't a long guard (where the elbows are bent 135 degrees or more) work faster and be more flexible? With the long guard you can just make a fist and punch it up and through to the head.

There is no right and wrong but trade off.

There are no special advantage there. If you use

- double legs on me, your head will be exposed for my head lock.
- kicking to my leg, your leg will be exposed for me to grab it.

1. Keep the finger lock:

PRO: You have stronger frame (we don't lock fingers with gloves on).
CON: Take times to unlock your fingers.

2. 180 degree guard:

PRO: You have maximum length guard. Harder for your opponent's punch to reach to your head.
CON: You lose punching power.
I'm still allergic to "push".
User avatar
johnwang
Great Old One
 
Posts: 9460
Joined: Tue May 13, 2008 5:26 pm

Re: Punching/blocking drill

Postby marvin8 on Mon Apr 20, 2020 7:36 pm

johnwang wrote:Here is a "rhino guard" test clip. It proves that "rhino guard" has value in combat.

The test clip "proves" clinching has value in combat, not "rhino guard" the way you describe and drill it--blocking and wrapping the punching arm.

johnwang wrote:The testing rule is simple:

- If A can punch on B's head, A wins that round.

If A can:

- punch on B's liver
- punch on B's kidney
- punch on B's solar plexus
- kick on B's groin
- kick on B's knee
- kick on B's leg
- control B's elbow
- enter B's side door, etc.,

while B protects their head, does B still win that round?

johnwang wrote:There is no right and wrong but trade off.

One might say there is a "wrong" way to drill and test, or GIGO. "The Worst Habit in Martial Arts:"


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OuK_KswdlUs

johnwang wrote:There are no special advantage there. If you use

- double legs on me, your head will be exposed for my head lock.
- kicking to my leg, your leg will be exposed for me to grab it.

One either blocks a punch to one's head or defends the double leg or low kick.

johnwang wrote:1. Keep the finger lock:

PRO: You have stronger frame (we don't lock fingers with gloves on).
CON: Take times to unlock your fingers.

2. 180 degree guard:

PRO: You have maximum length guard. Harder for your opponent's punch to reach to your head.
CON: You lose punching power.

CON: "Rhino guard" may hinder one's mobility, speed, power, etc. There is a disadvantage to being double weighted, not coordinating hand and foot, not using six harmonies, easier to trap, control, etc:

Image
User avatar
marvin8
Wuji
 
Posts: 2061
Joined: Mon Mar 02, 2009 8:30 pm

Previous

Return to Xingyiquan - Baguazhang - Taijiquan

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 10 guests