Rasmus: COMBAT TAIJI breaking structure, Elastic wave energy

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Rasmus: COMBAT TAIJI breaking structure, Elastic wave energy

Postby marvin8 on Sun Apr 28, 2019 9:32 am

Mark Rasmus
Published on Apr 27, 2019:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OuANlGXjnLU


Mark Rasmus
Published on Apr 25, 2019:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HYLFLVxbsrk
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Re: Rasmus: COMBAT TAIJI breaking structure, Elastic wave energy

Postby Bao on Mon Apr 29, 2019 7:00 am

Good stuff. Very familiar material, similar to what my first teacher though he never spoke about qi, fascia or any fuzzy words.

Liked this new one below. Some things missing to make it work as a strike though. Would like to see him do it with speed against a bag or a protection to see if he manages to stay relaxed and aligned through the impact. Not so easy as one would think.

https://youtube.com/watch?v=0C5ysBZPI2c

Last edited by Bao on Mon Apr 29, 2019 7:00 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Rasmus: COMBAT TAIJI breaking structure, Elastic wave energy

Postby Rhen on Mon Apr 29, 2019 12:34 pm

let's see it work against a much larger opponent that just doesn't stand there and let you stick to them. FFS
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Re: Rasmus: COMBAT TAIJI breaking structure, Elastic wave energy

Postby BruceP on Mon Apr 29, 2019 2:21 pm

What Rhen said...

Sambo or open grappling tournament

Toughman competition
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Re: Rasmus: COMBAT TAIJI breaking structure, Elastic wave energy

Postby Greg J on Mon Apr 29, 2019 8:19 pm

Thanks for sharing these videos, Marvin! I appreciate your time and energy giving everyone here videos to watch, reflect on, and potentially train.

I have to say that I disagree with Mark Rasmus' statements in video one (Controlling and Breaking Structure) that before you strike you have to control/ break structure. If someone is walking up on you and wants to fight, trying to trap their hands (especially in the way he demonstrates) and break their structure before countering is asking to get knocked out. Even if someone uses trickery to get close to you and then tries to sucker punch you, a more realistic (imho) response is to get a good protective guard up (like the Thai Long Guard, or the "turtle," or the "dracula"), counter, and then get away.

I do agree that if you are grip fighting it makes sense to break structure or "throw" the limb and clear a line to strike, and I like how he was offbalancing his partner before hitting. But doing this by just lightly covering his training partner's forearms with his palms (as he was showing) doesn't resonate with me. I think that if he allowed his partner to resist/ move more we would see the limits to this approach.

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Last edited by Greg J on Mon Apr 29, 2019 8:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Rasmus: COMBAT TAIJI breaking structure, Elastic wave energy

Postby Bao on Tue Apr 30, 2019 12:42 am

If someone is walking up on you and wants to fight, trying to trap their hands (especially in the way he demonstrates) and break their structure before countering is asking to get knocked out.


IMO it's not a matter of "trying", but more a matter of what you know that you can do it or not. If you don't know what you are doing, this is not what you should "try". But for the opponent speaking, If you are in a compromised structure, will you still be in the position where you can deliver a knockout punch? I would doubt it. I do agree with the initial approach here of going in and "bridge", take contact. But I am not sure that his way to "control" the structure and even more less sure if his way to break structure would work very well when someone is moving around, both feet and upper body. That can be done as a defensive move, but there are maybe better ways to follow up the initial contact. However, this is good practice and there are many practical ways to use the principles taught.

a more realistic (imho) response is to get a good protective guard up (like the Thai Long Guard, or the "turtle," or the "dracula"), counter, and then get away.


When you compete or do sparring with gloves, you don't have the opportunity to get in and attach to you opponent. If you don't have gloves then you don't need to hold on to the boxing mindset where you are not allowed to grab or wrestle. For real fighting, if you know someone wants to fight you that is, just going in and closing the distance and bridge (touch his limbs/doing something with his limbs) as soon as possible, is far better than standing there in a guard waiting for punches. IMO. But you obviously need to practice it in a less stationary manner than shown here.
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Re: Rasmus: COMBAT TAIJI breaking structure, Elastic wave energy

Postby middleway on Tue Apr 30, 2019 1:13 am

let's see it work against a much larger opponent that just doesn't stand there and let you stick to them. FFS


Agreed. How big is Mark Rasmus? Because every partner he ever works with looks about 2/3rds his size! either he is a giant or he picks very small demo partners!

When you compete or do sparring with gloves, you don't have the opportunity to get in and attach to you opponent.


why? Shouldnt we be able to connect and adhere with any surface?

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Re: Rasmus: COMBAT TAIJI breaking structure, Elastic wave energy

Postby Trick on Tue Apr 30, 2019 1:31 am

Bao wrote:
When you compete or do sparring with gloves, you don't have the opportunity to get in and attach to you opponent

Heavyweight boxers seemingly tend to go into clinch all the time. I don’t know, maybe there would be more action if the referee would let them keep clinching and not yell “break” all the time. There should be allowed a little stand up wrestling such as arm-drags and neck-pulling
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Re: Rasmus: COMBAT TAIJI breaking structure, Elastic wave energy

Postby Bao on Tue Apr 30, 2019 2:57 am

middleway wrote:Agreed. How big is Mark Rasmus? Because every partner he ever works with looks about 2/3rds his size! either he is a giant or he picks very small demo partners!


He is very, very big. A giant really. But everyone who has met him says that he is as soft as it gets.

When you compete or do sparring with gloves, you don't have the opportunity to get in and attach to you opponent.


why? Shouldnt we be able to connect and adhere with any surface?



Interesting example, think I've watched it before. There are many Chen, PTTC and others who do like putting on gloves. William Chen has no problem, he likes the striking game. Personally, I don't like to spar with gloves. I like to get in and take contact early and "listen" with my hands. If you put on gloves, you always get into that waiting for strikes game. You can obviously not use your hands the same way and you lose a lot of sensitivity. I need to be able to use the surface on my skin. Maybe others can connect their sensitivity through gloves. I have no idea how this should be done. :P
Last edited by Bao on Tue Apr 30, 2019 2:58 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Rasmus: COMBAT TAIJI breaking structure, Elastic wave energy

Postby Trick on Tue Apr 30, 2019 5:24 am

Sensitivity is not just in the hands. And how about in winter wearing thick winter clothes. Sensitivity should go deeper and further than just stay on the surface
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Re: Rasmus: COMBAT TAIJI breaking structure, Elastic wave energy

Postby Trick on Tue Apr 30, 2019 5:34 am

Good to know this Rasmus is a “giant”. If he can’t do Taiji under the table style then not much to be impressed about. 8-)
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Re: Rasmus: COMBAT TAIJI breaking structure, Elastic wave energy

Postby Bao on Tue Apr 30, 2019 6:46 am

Sensitivity is not just in the hands. And how about in winter wearing thick winter clothes. Sensitivity should go deeper and further than just stay on the surface


That is what a sword master would say.

The thing for unarmed combat is that you want to be light and nimble, have a light touch, be free to move and fast to change at will. Anything that restricts or slows you down should be avoided if you can. IMO. Your very best sensitivity is on the very top of the skin, the surface. Go deeper with stronger pressure and you’ll numb it and become slower. And also, if there’s something in between you and what you want to feel, your reactions will be affected.
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Re: Rasmus: COMBAT TAIJI breaking structure, Elastic wave energy

Postby Bao on Tue Apr 30, 2019 6:47 am

Trick wrote:Good to know this Rasmus is a “giant”. If he can’t do Taiji under the table style then not much to be impressed about. 8-)


Giants usually have giant tables, so I am sure he would use a big enough table. :P
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Re: Rasmus: COMBAT TAIJI breaking structure, Elastic wave energy

Postby wayne hansen on Tue Apr 30, 2019 12:11 pm

There is a reason why catholic boys sleep with boxing gloves on
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Re: Rasmus: COMBAT TAIJI breaking structure, Elastic wave energy

Postby Steve James on Tue Apr 30, 2019 2:16 pm

When you compete or do sparring with gloves, you don't have the opportunity to get in and attach to you opponent.


Thai boxers use contact to clinch and throw, and they use gloves.

Gloves help if you hit with your knuckles. Bas Ruten illustrated that it's not necessary to hit with them in order to knock people down and out. Even so, not having gloves on will not necessarily offer any advantage at all against a good boxer with gloves on. It will still be a question of what he can do versus what you are able to do.

Afa effectiveness, the question is not what a big guy can do against a smaller one. The issue is what the smaller guy can do against a bigger one. That was the thing about the early UFC; the bjj worked because what works will work on anyone, especially if they were unfamiliar with it.

There's no point in criticizing demonstrations of principle. They might work perfectly well for the people involved.
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