Video to help with back pain

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Video to help with back pain

Postby wdhc Taijiquan on Sat Sep 21, 2019 10:38 pm

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Re: Video to help with back pain

Postby charles on Sun Sep 22, 2019 7:17 am

At 9:40, "Standing Steak" sounds yummy, but the practice is usually called standing stake. ;-)

Otherwise, the video hasn't much to do with internal martial arts.
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Re: Video to help with back pain

Postby Bhassler on Sun Sep 22, 2019 8:36 am

It's also factually wrong in places.
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Re: Video to help with back pain

Postby Trick on Mon Sep 23, 2019 12:53 am

Standing Steak" sounds yummy, .[/quote]
Yummy!? Dont know about that, sound as it still stand on its four legs 8-)


But anyway, I remember from middle school that our PE teacher at the beginning and end of every class had us go down on our four, and in that position swank as mush as possible and then bend the back up as much as possible a couple of times. Saying,’do this everyday and you will have no back problem when you get older’
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Re: Video to help with back pain

Postby wdhc Taijiquan on Thu Sep 26, 2019 11:27 am

Bhassler wrote:It's also factually wrong in places.

Please clarify.
Info cones from experience in taijiquan, qigong, and as a physical therapy tech working for a chiropractor.
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Re: Video to help with back pain

Postby Bhassler on Thu Sep 26, 2019 1:28 pm

  • Gravity doesn't pull down on the spine 24/7, wearing down the cushion. The disc is semi-permeable-- it compresses during the day, and then refills at night when we sleep (when gravity is not pulling down on the disc per se). They would eventually wear out over a long period of time, like anything else, but barring dysfunction they do what they're made to do, and the force of a percentage of a person's body weight distributed across the surface/volume of a disc isn't something that should be considered as a problem that needs fixing.
  • The optimal mechanical position for the spine is anatomical neutral (by definition). Rounding the back, hollowing the chest, and sinking the ribs are not activities that promote neutral spine. The natural curve of the spine is not something that needs to be "alleviated." The flat/rounded lumbar promoted in Yang style taiji actually puts uneven pressure on the discs, which is exactly what you call out as a problem earlier in the video. Anyone that thinks the Yang style straight spine is reducing pressure should probably take a closer look at the joint kinematics.
  • While not factually wrong, saying a particular alignment allows the weight to go straight to the feet is a meaningless statement. Just about anyone who's standing has their weight going to their feet (if anyone has an example of someone standing without the weight going to their feet, I'd love to see it). Where in the foot, to a very precise degree, and how as it relates to the rest of one's posture, is key to alignment and root as it relates to taijiquan, but is not something that is generally addressed when talking about "posture" in the generic sense.
  • Toes pointing straight forward is also imprecise, as not all five toes on a foot point in the same direction. There are also issues of hip/femur shape, tibial torsion, etc. that impact what an individual's optimal hip alignment at rest should be.
  • Just looking purely at mechanical posture, optimal resting position would be feet at hip width, not shoulder width.
  • Your side profile images show a head forward posture, not vertical alignment.

This is just from the first 1:50. It's not really meant as a criticism of you or your work specifically, but it goes to show why people shouldn't get health advice from social media. If someone has real issues, they need to be addressed in a way that's appropriate to the individual. Realistically, the whole structuralist model of posture is problematic, and doesn't account for recent science, or the reality of how people live and move in the material world.
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Re: Video to help with back pain

Postby Bao on Thu Sep 26, 2019 2:17 pm

The optimal mechanical position for the spine is anatomical neutral (by definition). Rounding the back, hollowing the chest, and sinking the ribs are not activities that promote neutral spine. The natural curve of the spine is not something that needs to be "alleviated." The flat/rounded lumbar promoted in Yang style taiji actually puts uneven pressure on the discs, which is exactly what you call out as a problem earlier in the video. Anyone that thinks the Yang style straight spine is reducing pressure should probably take a closer look at the joint kinematics.


Good sum up 8-)

Tai Chi has never helped me with back problems, only made it worse, but some Bagua exercises and Xingyi santishi has helped a lot.

Especially the narrow Santishi with 90% or close to 100% weight on the rear foot. Already cured back pain twice or three times using this stance. When I hardly could move, had trouble to raise and sit down, I forced myself into this stance. Don't know how to explain it, but it sort of takes away the pressure from the spine and re-distributes it evenly throughout the body. Just ten or twenty minutes and my back felt as it was almost cured. Works like a charm. Or magic sort of. I was very surprised how good it worked and almost as surprised when I could do it again a few years later.
Last edited by Bao on Thu Sep 26, 2019 2:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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