Police brutality?

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Re: Police brutality in New York?

Postby Steve James on Sun Dec 07, 2014 12:39 pm

Ah, so it was wrong for someone to let him die?
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Re: Police brutality in New York?

Postby windwalker on Sun Dec 07, 2014 12:44 pm

who was in charge?
who directed the arrest?

kinda figured the one in "charge" would have
halted or stopped anything that "she" felt was illegal
or againts the regs.

he died in an ambulance on the way to a hosp.
you mean the ambulance crew let him die?
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Re: Police brutality in New York?

Postby grzegorz on Sun Dec 07, 2014 12:50 pm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ya_kKYyf4o



According to Michael Savage all the cops involved should get life in prison.

Savage nailed it, he said the conservatives now have support the cops in anything they do because of their stance on Ferguson.
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Re: Police brutality in New York?

Postby windwalker on Sun Dec 07, 2014 12:56 pm

while I dont agree.
IMO its pretty clear why they didnt find any charges.
just didnt fit the story line.
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Re: Police brutality in New York?

Postby Steve James on Sun Dec 07, 2014 1:04 pm

windwalker wrote:who was in charge?
who directed the arrest?

he died in an ambulance on the way to a hosp.
you mean the ambulance crew let him die?


No, he was pronounced dead in the ambulance. The official cause was "homicide," not 'accidental,' not 'natural causes,' and not 'suicide.'

But, you ask now "Who was in charge?" What difference does that make if what happened before the incident had nothing to do with his death? Either it did or it didn't. The "died in the ambulance" isn't an excuse that would fly in a courtroom. The defendant would say, I hit him; but, he died in the ambulance.
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Re: Police brutality in New York?

Postby windwalker on Sun Dec 07, 2014 7:16 pm

Steve James wrote:
windwalker wrote:who was in charge?
who directed the arrest?

he died in an ambulance on the way to a hosp.
you mean the ambulance crew let him die?


No, he was pronounced dead in the ambulance. The official cause was "homicide," not 'accidental,' not 'natural causes,' and not 'suicide.'

But, you ask now "Who was in charge?" What difference does that make if what happened before the incident had nothing to do with his death? Either it did or it didn't. The "died in the ambulance" isn't an excuse that would fly in a courtroom. The defendant would say, I hit him; but, he died in the ambulance.


no he died in the ambulance.

6. Garner did not die at the scene of the confrontation. He suffered cardiac arrest in the ambulance taking him to the hospital and was pronounced dead about an hour later.

http://www.newsmax.com/Newsfront/eric-g ... id/611058/

homicide only means that it does not fall into any of the other categories
as far as the officers knew, he left the scene injured but alive.

the person in charge has the responsibility for what happens or not.
the person in charge did not try to stop it, nor report any wrong doing by those she was in charge of.
it took 5 people to bring the man down.
had it not been videoed and he didnt resist arrest it would have just been another day in the life.
had he lived it wouldnt have made the news.

at any rate it is interesting that nothing is mentioned of who was in charge on site. dostn fit the populist narrative.
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Re: Police brutality in New York?

Postby windwalker on Sun Dec 07, 2014 7:39 pm

As a result of Garner's death, four EMTs and paramedics who responded to the scene were suspended without pay on July 21, 2014;[17] officers Damico and Pantaleo were placed on desk duty, and Pantaleo was stripped of his service gun and badge.[18]


interesting why where the EMT and paramedics, suspended with out pay?

According to Police Commissioner Bill Bratton, an ambulance was immediately called to the scene and Garner was transported to Richmond University Medical Center. He went into cardiac arrest while he was in the vehicle and was pronounced dead approximately one hour later at the hospital.[37] A second video apparently taken by a bystander was later released that appears to show that Garner lay motionless and unresponsive for several minutes before an ambulance arrived.[21][38]

Garner's death was recorded by Ramsey Orta, a friend of Garner's.[2][39]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_of_Eric_Garner
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Re: Police brutality in New York?

Postby windwalker on Sun Dec 07, 2014 7:53 pm

Israel Miranda, president of Local 27 of the Uniformed EMT and Paramedics, said that responding emergency personnel should have provided Garner with supplemental oxygen, even if he had a pulse. Miranda's union represents FDNY EMS personnel, but not RUMC EMTs.

Miranda made particular note of Garner's words to cops, captured on video, "I can't breathe! I can't breathe!"

Said Miranda, "Knowing that he's saying he's having trouble breathing, at this point, you're going to be giving him oxygen."

An EMT could also insert an airway tube into a patient's mouth that's attached to a bag to assist breathing.

One veteran EMS source questioned why the responding EMTs didn't bring any equipment when they arrived on the scene.

"She should have either put him on oxygen or put an airway in his mouth," the source said. "They were there for four and a half minutes and they did none of that."

The source also questioned the way the EMT looked for Garner's pulse, noting that a check near the carotid artery would be performed "to the left or the right of the trachea, not on the side of the neck."

Otherwise, the source said, "You're feeling your own pulse in your hand."

http://www.silive.com/news/index.ssf/20 ... espon.html

interesting
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Re: Police brutality in New York?

Postby Steve James on Sun Dec 07, 2014 9:25 pm

Last year, but here's something to get outraged about, if not the other cases.

Grand jury rejects criminal charges in death of Robert Saylor, man with Down syndrome

Less than five miles from the theater where a man with Down syndrome died at the hands of the law enforcement officials he idolized, a grand jury on Friday heard the details of the case and decided that no crime had been committed.

“They felt no further investigation was necessary,” Frederick County State’s Attorney J. Charles Smith said at a news conference outside the county’s courthouse.

Grand jury proceedings are secretive in Maryland, but Smith said that his office presented the jury with 17 witness statements and that three deputies involved in the death — Lt. Scott Jewell, Sgt. Rich Rochford and Deputy First Class James Harris — all testified.

An attorney for the parents of Robert Ethan Saylor, who died at the age of 26, described their reaction as “extremely disappointed and saddened and concerned.”

“This is a really hard day for them,” attorney Sharon Krevor-Weisbaum said. “They’re going to have to digest this unsettling news and determine their next step.”

Nationally, the case has drawn wide attention from parents of children with Down syndrome and advocacy groups. More than 1,000 angry messages also fill the Facebook page of the Frederick County Sheriff’s Office.

Saylor was known for his hugs and was so fascinated with the police that he would sometimes call 911 just to ask a question.

In January, he and an aide watched “Zero Dark Thirty” at a Frederick movie theater. As soon as it ended, Saylor wanted to watch it again and would not leave the theater.

Officials say this is what happened next: The aide, an 18-year-old woman, was getting the car when a theater employee called the three off-duty officers, who were working security at the Westview Promenade shopping center, and told them that Saylor needed to buy another ticket or leave.

Smith, who would not go into great detail about the investigation, said that when the deputies confronted Saylor, he verbally and physically resisted their attempts to remove him. He said they restrained him using three sets of handcuffs because of his large size. Smith said that when the deputies placed Smith on his stomach, it was for “one to two minutes” and that once Saylor began showing signs of distress, the deputies removed the handcuffs, called for help and administered CPR.

Krevor-Weisbaum said that a witness heard Saylor cry out for his mother, who even though he didn’t know it, wasn’t far away. Alerted by someone to what was happening, Patti Saylor was on her way to the theater and was almost there, Krevor-Weisbaum said.

In February, the Chief Medical Examiner’s Office in Baltimore ruled Saylor’s death a homicide as a result of asphyxia. On Friday, Smith said that the report indicated that Down syndrome and obesity made Saylor more susceptible to breathing problems.

Krevor-Weisbaum said that Saylor had no ongoing health problems. She added that his parents had not seen the autopsy report, although they have requested it, along with all the files from the investigation. She said the family has been concerned that the investigation was handled by the same sheriff’s office that employs the deputies.

Since February, the deputies have been on paid administrative leave. An attorney for them said Friday that they welcomed the chance to testify and did so voluntarily.

“They’ve stood by patiently waiting for this day to come,” attorney Patrick J. McAndrew said. “This was an unfortunate set of circumstances. Each of these professionals, devoted law enforcement officers, did what was necessary under the circumstances, and they did what their training dictated that they do.”

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Re: Police brutality in New York?

Postby Steve James on Sun Dec 07, 2014 9:56 pm

I stand corrected on Garner's time of death. Afa homicide not falling into the other categories, though, that's nonsense. There is a dictionary definition of it, and it simply means that someone killed someone. It itself, I think you should say, "homicide" is not illegal. "Murder" is illegal. For ex., an executed convict's death certificate will read "homicide." It's a killing, but not criminal. Iinm, the Biblical commandment is "not murder," not "kill."

Yeah, some people have suggested that the officer and officers could have done more for Garner while he was in distress. That's not murder; that's negligence. Now, why they were careless is another thing. If they did care, then they were incompetent. Like the Father said, what are you supposed to do when someone says he can't breathe. Even a stranger. But, sympathy, etc., are out of the question when it comes to fatsos and so on. Ya gotta help those in shape people, though.

Anyway, remember Frank Serpico? He wrote about the Garner case.

Serpico: Incidents like Eric Garner's death drive wedge between police and society

Was I surprised by the Staten Island grand jury? Of course not. When was the last time a police officer was indicted?

This is the use of excessive force for no apparent reason on a guy who is selling loosie cigarettes; what is the threat to your well-being? If a police officer's life is in danger, he has every right to use every force in his means to defend himself.

In the old days, they used to put a gun or a knife on somebody after a shooting. Now they don't even bother.

But today, we have cops crying wolf all the time. They testify "I was in fear of my life," the grand jury buys it, the DA winks and nods, and there's no indictment.

I remember a guy I worked with back in the 81st Precinct, an ex-Marine named Murphy. He would not turn out for roll call until his shoes were spit-shined, and his uniform was creased.

One night, he was called to a family dispute. There was a man waiting behind the door, and he came out with a butcher knife and slashed Murphy's face.

Murphy could have emptied his gun in him. Instead, he disarmed the man and put him in cuffs. What's happening today in the performance of some officers can only be described as sheer cowardice. They don't belong in the uniform, and they shouldn't have weapons — whether they're cops or not.

I hear cops saying all the time — and they're proud of it — "shoot first, ask questions later."

They say, "It's my job to get home safe." Yes, but not at the cost of a human being who never posed a threat to you in the first place.

I called for, way back when before the Knapp Commission, for an independent investigative body. When I was testifying about police corruption, I saw very clearly how the DA can lead the grand jury in any direction they so desire.

A 'nervous' rookie cop, in a tragic misfire, fatally shot unarmed Akai Gurley without a word of warning in a Brooklyn housing project stairwell on Nov. 20.

The people want justice, and they need justice. And the police are supposed to be protecting their civil rights

Why would a kid in the inner city call a cop? When I was growing up, my mother would say "Any problem, call a cop." He would show up and assess the problem, and you wouldn't become the victim.

I want to be clear. I'm not talking about all police. There are plenty of good police, and I hear from them on a daily basis.

But the police are becoming our enemy, and society is becoming the enemy of the police.

Somebody with clear, objective and impartial thinking needs to come to their senses and find a solution.

Corruption-busting former NYPD Detective Frank Serpico, whose exploits were made into a best-selling book and a movie with Al Pacino, retired from the force in 1972.
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Re: Police brutality in New York?

Postby windwalker on Sun Dec 07, 2014 11:14 pm

I want to be clear. I'm not talking about all police. There are plenty of good police, and I hear from them on a daily basis.
But the police are becoming our enemy, and society is becoming the enemy of the police.


kind of bs, who is he talking about if its not about the police. oh ya, but there are some good ones

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Black female Police sergeant Kizzy Adoni supervised the fatal arrest and on-scene medical treatment of Eric Garner. She testified “His condition did not seem serious and he did not appear to get worse.” as he lay on the sidewalk afterward. The guy wasn’t choked to death. It appears more likely he had a classic stressed-out fat man’s heart attack.
Read more at http://patdollard.com/2014/12/sgt-kizzy ... bEgXTqZ.99


Like the Father said, what are you supposed to do when someone says he can't breathe.

probably need to take it up with the person in charge.
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Re: Police brutality in New York?

Postby windwalker on Sun Dec 07, 2014 11:42 pm

Having spent my entire career in patrol, I understand police culture and how patrol officers act and think. However, as a sergeant of police, I was expected to supervise, manage and control the field operations of the subordinate officers under my command. Being a supervisor in any profession requires one to be able and willing to make the tough and unpopular decisions; it goes along with the territory.

So then for a sergeant, and a black woman at that, to stand idly by and do nothing is egregious. Certainly, it is my hope that Commissioner Bratton takes a long, hard look at the activity of all of the other officers involved in the “wolf-packing” of Eric Garner as well as the failure to act on the part of that sergeant.

Read more at http://www.eurweb.com/2014/12/blackandb ... ErWuKYS.99


no news or mention of the officer in charge in main stream media.

she did act, and apparently found nothing wrong in the actions of her self or the officers she was in charge of.
my bet would be that this is something that they practice and do all the time, only this time due to the poor health of
the suspect, he died from his efforts in resisting the arrest.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vWwLY-uKmoA

interesting rebuttal

"they'er known for the their physical aptitude and not their mental"
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Re: Police brutality in New York?

Postby Teazer on Mon Dec 08, 2014 10:02 am

Why does man Kill? He kills for food.
And not only food: frequently there must be a beverage.
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Re: Police brutality in New York?

Postby grzegorz on Mon Dec 08, 2014 10:57 am

Funny how the police want the Rams held accountable for raising their hands in the air during their game two weeks ago. Oh the irony!
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Re: Police brutality in New York?

Postby windwalker on Mon Dec 08, 2014 1:59 pm

Teazer wrote:5% of arresting NYPD officers make 40% of all resisting arrest charges

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2014/12/06/1349810/-5-of-New-York-City-cops-make-40-of-all-resisting-arrest-charges


yep your right we should be checking it out, peoples rights getting violated
where is Eric Holder, where is the Al, and Jess
http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/sea ... ra-n263841

need to call in the feds, see if her civil rights where violated.
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