Dream learning

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Dream learning

Postby Trick on Fri Nov 02, 2018 11:56 pm

Strange dreamin last night.……I find myself in an indoor sport arena, where I go through the karate kata(form) ‘Bassai-dai’, I’m dressed casual but wearing rollerblades!? Practicing with the blades turn out to be challenging but get a good feel at it(I’ve never ever tried rollerblading, but did quite a lot of rollerskating when young)...Dream continue, I notice a young “Russian” woman formally dressed in a Karate Gi(practice uniform) doing the Kata ‘Heian-yondan’ and then going through some bunkai(applications) of the moves with two other Russian guys. Standing by watching this I get the idea(in the dream) that there are “hidden” elbow strikes in that Kata? …For sure there ar elbow strikes in that Kata but they are quite obvious. Anyway, when I got up this morning I went through the Kata with “elbows” on my mind and “found” some more elbow techniques in it…Dreams are quite funny. Back when I practiced Karate I often had dreams where I was practicing strikes, kicks, Kata sequences and sparring(without rollerblades and Russians) but never had such dreams connected to my CMA’s practice....Might be back to the Dojo this night, maybe Russian Lady sensei will be around 8-)
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Re: Dream learning

Postby oragami_itto on Sat Nov 03, 2018 7:50 am

I think it was Cheng Man Ching who said he had a breakthrough after dreaming he had to fight but had no arms.
"This principle is very obvious and requires no further elaboration."
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Re: Dream learning

Postby Peacedog on Sat Nov 03, 2018 10:31 am

The Tibetans have the most developed schools of dream yoga and most of that stuff is written down.

A technique I frequently use with people who have milder forms of PTSD that involve recurrent bad dreams is as follows:
1. Place a pen and note pad by your bed.
2. Immediately before falling asleep say aloud, "I will remember my dreams."
3. Immediately upon waking and before getting out of bed write down anything you remember about your dreams.

A few notes on this process. First, the notebook should be single purpose. Only use it for your dreamwork. Within a week of doing this most people have trouble keeping their notes under a page. Only write a single page for now.

After a few week to a few months you will start to "wake up" in your dreams and be able to act independently in that state. With a little more work you can begin to turn things on and off in your dreams. With further work you can begin to program your dreams in advance and use them for studying specific material, etc. Finally, with a lot of work, the dream state can become a kind of doorway, or jumping off point, for out of body type work usually involving the astral realm.

Oddly, I have seen a connection between frequent dreams about fighting and parasitic infection. While anecdotal it is worth noting if you have any odd health problems.

Best of luck.
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Re: Dream learning

Postby MistyMonkeyMethod on Sat Nov 03, 2018 2:17 pm

I've tried this technique before, but not to any extent as you described. Didnt know it originated with the Tibetans. Can you recommend any reading material on this subject? Thanks.
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Re: Dream learning

Postby Peacedog on Sat Nov 03, 2018 2:43 pm

MMM,

The method I described is my own.

The Tibetan methods are much more complicated.

It has been a few years, but I think these were the two books I read that got into technique form their perspective.

The Tibetan Yogas of Dreams and Sleep by Dahlby

https://www.amazon.com/Tibetan-Yogas-Dr ... dream+yoga

and

Dream Yoga and the Practice of Natural Light by Katz

https://www.amazon.com/Dream-Yoga-Pract ... dream+yoga
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Re: Dream learning

Postby Steve James on Sat Nov 03, 2018 2:45 pm

Well, you can google "lucid dreaming techniques" for dream control. Interesting question about origins, whether Buddhist, Hindu, or other.

The best time to learn/practice some things, like language, is right before speech. I think one of the first signs of having acquired some of a language is when one dreams in that language. But, I think this is a question of learning subconsciously.

My experience with lucid dreaming was in the '70s when I was working in construction. I'd have a nightmare every night about falling from a beam. Actually, the nightmare was that I fell but was able to grab onto the edge with my fingertips. The problem was that I couldn't pull myself back up. So, I can't recall who I learned the process from, but the solution was to go to sleep with the intention of controlling my dream. This worked because it was certain that I'd have the dream every night. After all, I walked on beams all day for a living. (Of course, the dream was a product of my insecurity).

Anyway, I went to sleep and sure enough had the dream. This time, though, I held on --and I woke myself up before I even slipped. I'm not sure if it was the next night, but at some point I pulled myself up -and the dream ended. I'm pretty sure that part of the reason was also the fact that my hands were getting physically stronger too. Ironically, the dream began to change. When I pulled myself up, I'd take off and end up high in the air. :) But, I'd just end the dream, or any dream I didn't like.

Long story, short, you can control your dreams, at least as far as the outcomes. The troubling dreams are the 'nightmares' that you can't control. Dream time and sleep time can be very useful. Some people ask questions before they go to sleep and wake up with the answers.
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Re: Dream learning

Postby Trick on Sat Nov 03, 2018 9:30 pm

Peacedog wrote:The Tibetans have the most developed schools of dream yoga and most of that stuff is written down.

A technique I frequently use with people who have milder forms of PTSD that involve recurrent bad dreams is as follows:
1. Place a pen and note pad by your bed.
2. Immediately before falling asleep say aloud, "I will remember my dreams."
3. Immediately upon waking and before getting out of bed write down anything you remember about your dreams.

A few notes on this process. First, the notebook should be single purpose. Only use it for your dreamwork. Within a week of doing this most people have trouble keeping their notes under a page. Only write a single page for now.

After a few week to a few months you will start to "wake up" in your dreams and be able to act independently in that state. With a little more work you can begin to turn things on and off in your dreams. With further work you can begin to program your dreams in advance and use them for studying specific material, etc. Finally, with a lot of work, the dream state can become a kind of doorway, or jumping off point, for out of body type work usually involving the astral realm.

Oddly, I have seen a connection between frequent dreams about fighting and parasitic infection. While anecdotal it is worth noting if you have any odd health problems.

Best of luck.

Yeah. I thought about writing down the dreams as soon as woken up. My dream practicing Karate forms I remembered very clear when I woke up, but sometimes or probably most times although I know I dreamt something and even remember it was something interesting but cannot really remember a basic “plot” or details. I guess it could have to do what time during ones sleep the dream occurred, a dream that occurs early on during the sleep might not be remembered as well as dreams later on just before the rise and shine stage in the morning....Interesting about the connection dreaming about fighting and having parasitic infection. The wearing rollerblades while practicing could probably have to do with I’m having a problem with one of my hips which make me to do some slight adjustments while practicing my Taiji form. But then also later yesterday while our walking I took a misstep on a lose stone in the pavement and sprained my ankle, so the dream might have tried to warn me to mind my stepping later on the day!? a thought that came later when going to bed yesterday night
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Re: Dream learning

Postby MistyMonkeyMethod on Sun Nov 04, 2018 8:56 am

Peacedog wrote:MMM,

The method I described is my own.

The Tibetan methods are much more complicated.

It has been a few years, but I think these were the two books I read that got into technique form their perspective.

The Tibetan Yogas of Dreams and Sleep by Dahlby

https://www.amazon.com/Tibetan-Yogas-Dr ... dream+yoga

and

Dream Yoga and the Practice of Natural Light by Katz

https://www.amazon.com/Dream-Yoga-Pract ... dream+yoga


Great! Many thanks Peacedog!
“Make everything in you an ear, each atom of your being, and you will hear at every moment what the Source is whispering to you, just to you and for you, without any need for my words or anyone else’s.”— Rumi
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Re: Dream learning

Postby Peacedog on Sun Nov 04, 2018 10:24 am

Trick,

The key step is writing down everything the second you wake up. This appears to short circuit some kind of auto-delete function in the human memory system.


Best of luck.
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Re: Dream learning

Postby northern_mantis on Sun Nov 04, 2018 12:54 pm

Cool stuff, nice to think that training doesn't stop with sleep. If I do energy work before bed I always get snake dreams and I fucking hate snakes! Weird because there is no cultural influence for this so who knows where it comes from. So no qigong before bed for me!
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Re: Dream learning

Postby Peacedog on Sun Nov 04, 2018 2:00 pm

NM,

The best use of this is for getting control over what can be charitably described as "self defeating behaviors." Practicing physical skills doesn't work that well as your body still has to develop in certain ways to pull that off. But, it does work very well for getting control over repetitive negative behaviors by essentially deleting them from your system.

Best,

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Re: Dream learning

Postby Bill on Sun Nov 04, 2018 2:26 pm

Sigmund Freud saw a snake as a phallic symbol and so it may represent a male figure that you find sexually attractive or threatening, depending upon how you feel in the dream. 8-)
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Re: Dream learning

Postby Franklin on Sun Nov 04, 2018 2:38 pm

it can be cool to play around in the dream state...

to get the process going
it can be helpful to do a self hypnotic induction before sleep
this is covered in Silva's mind control course/book
(but he shy's away from calling it a hypnotic induction - even though that is what it is...)
that is probably the most widespread application of this in the west

basically all it entails is relaxing (there are some processes to go through to get physically and mentally relaxed)
then telling yourself- I will recall my dreams
or I will be able to remember my dreams
all the way to telling yourself you will be able to wake up within your dream, control it, or that you want a solution to a certain problem, or an answer on something... etc...
(but even just telling yourself these thing right before you drift off is effective -- because you are essentially passing through this relaxation stage naturally as you drift off)

or even easier you can make listen to an audio that will do it for you
this guy makes some good stuff..
https://www.learningstrategies.com/Para ... /Dream.asp


I agree the journal next to the bed is a good idea
if you write down your dreams as soon as you wake up it will help your dream recall
which was stated earlier is the first step...

its also helpful to write them down
because over time you will see some patterns and recurring themes that you might want to address or work with/through..
that if you did not do the journal, they would have stayed in the background of your consciousness...


--------------------------------------------

as for learning in your dreams
where someone comes and teaches you something

that has only happened to me a couple times..
and was pretty helpful each time...
;D
Last edited by Franklin on Sun Nov 04, 2018 2:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Dream learning

Postby edededed on Sun Nov 04, 2018 6:07 pm

I think I have only had one lucid dreaming experience - but I woke up very quickly (tried looking down, but it only delayed the inevitable a bit).

Nowadays, a worse problem is that I hardly ever dream anymore it seems! (Maybe I remember having a dream only once in several months now.) Any way to get dreams back again? :D
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Re: Dream learning

Postby Franklin on Sun Nov 04, 2018 7:32 pm

edededed wrote:I think I have only had one lucid dreaming experience - but I woke up very quickly (tried looking down, but it only delayed the inevitable a bit).

Nowadays, a worse problem is that I hardly ever dream anymore it seems! (Maybe I remember having a dream only once in several months now.) Any way to get dreams back again? :D


when I started to play around with this stuff i thought that i did not dream...
cause I would very rarely remember any dream...

but what I read - was that even if you don't think you dream..
you actually dream- you just don't remember it..

I started to keep a journal next to the bed to write down anything right after I woke up
and started to tell my self that I would be able to remember any dreams that I had..
and found out that I did dream...

give it a try-- and see what happens...
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