bicycle question...

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Re: bicycle question...

Postby Mut on Sat May 24, 2008 8:53 pm

if you have the cleets set loosely then your feet will very rarely become stuck and the power output is far greater than with toeclips... of course using cleets takes a bit of practice... the first time i used them I fell over in the city during the lunch rush, right in front of many amused pedestrians. :-[
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Re: bicycle question...

Postby Michael on Sun May 25, 2008 4:23 pm

I saw a doctor in Portland in the hospital once who was wearing what looked like Vans, not sure of the brand, but they were combo shoes. Comfortable and normal looking, but they have cleets for pedaling and you don't have to have two sets of shoes to go to work.
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Re: bicycle question...

Postby ashe on Sun May 25, 2008 11:50 pm

Mut wrote:if you have the cleets set loosely then your feet will very rarely become stuck and the power output is far greater than with toeclips... of course using cleets takes a bit of practice... the first time i used them I fell over in the city during the lunch rush, right in front of many amused pedestrians. :-[


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Re: bicycle question...

Postby Mut on Mon May 26, 2008 1:23 am

yup was very .... shall we say... character building
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Re: bicycle question...

Postby Michael on Mon May 26, 2008 4:57 am

I found cleets much easier to deal with than those little metal cage thingies. Also, there are different kinds of cleats: SPD (Shimano), Time, Frog, and others. I used stuff for MTB that was good for dealing with mud, and I never road street, but I thought the Frogs were the best 'cause they allowed my feet to move like a centimeter or so laterally.
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Re: bicycle question...

Postby Steve James on Mon May 26, 2008 5:29 am

Well, cleats are best for high performance riders and serious cyclists. The benefit for novice cyclists is marginal, primarily because beginners don't pedal properly anyway. It is better for the novice to learn how to "ankle" --i.e., eliminate the dead (flat) spots in the pedal stroke-- than to simply lock himself in. That won't force him to use the up-stroke; however, having cleats will allow him to use that part of the stroke better, if he does.

Toe-cages and straps (without cleats) have the advantage of allowing someone to use flat-bottomed shoes that can be worn off the bike. The straps allow some pulling, keep the feet on the pedals and allow the rider's knees to travel. (Some cleats allow %travel; others have 3%-5%; but all of them eventually loosen up.

I used to race road and have to ride street. I used the same bike for both (a 1970 Frejus pro-track until it was stolen; then a 1982 Atala pro, which I still ride). When the teflon rim liners came out, I put them on. Other than flats, though, the major worry is the drivers. I wouldn't recommend that anyone unused to riding in the street start with cleats or any other type of active restraint. They aren't worth the minimal speed benefit.

In general, though, if you want a bike to go fast, then you want to spend money on wheels --the things that hit the road. Then, apart from mechanical functionality, the thing that matters most is the engine. So, eat your carbs, and don't forget to wear a helmet.
Last edited by Steve James on Mon May 26, 2008 5:30 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: bicycle question...

Postby Mut on Mon May 26, 2008 6:51 am

agree Steve, don't you think using cleets helps to eliminate the dead spots in the pedaling motion?
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Re: bicycle question...

Postby Steve James on Mon May 26, 2008 7:00 am

Mut wrote:agree Steve, don't you think using cleets helps to eliminate the dead spots in the pedaling motion?


Nah, I think someone who pedals "square" will probably continue. Then again, I was talking about a casual rider. If someone rides a lot, he'll probably become less square. But, it's not a guarantee.

Hey, if you really want to develop a round stroke, ride a fixed-wheel. You'll be able to tell right away. For training, I would often ride a fix that forced me to do high rpms. Of course, I mean in the street and on hills.

So, I had to look up ankling; and many present authorities advise to watch out. I.e., that over-emphasis can be bad. Otoh, I know that there are injuries that come from pedalling square and from keeping the foot restrained. Ultimately, it's very individual. If you have watched Lance Armstrong ride, you'll have heard people say that he "danced." Like walking, everyone has his own style. However one pedals, however, it's always a matter of using energy as efficiently as possible while avoiding injury. Yet, there are very few ex-racers who don't have any injuries or scars to show for it.

See here for one example:
Image
http://www.bikefitting.com/English/Theo ... ition.aspx

But, note the difference in foot position for the same thing here:
Image
http://www.enkeling.nl/beeld/misc/ankling.jpg
Last edited by Steve James on Mon May 26, 2008 7:36 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: bicycle question...

Postby iwalkthecircle on Mon May 26, 2008 11:34 am

i have a couple of bikes...

i been enjoying a fixed gear road bike.
try to buy a mtn SPD pedals, it is easier to walk and get in/out.
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